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Global Watch

A United States fighter downed a Syrian military aircraft for the first time when it bombed a Syrian rebel faction backed by Washington.

 

It could all be about to kick off in Myanmar. But this time in a good way for the country’s Rohingya Muslim minority. Possibly. Hopefully.

 

The Muslim world — a vast construct of over 1.5 billion souls stretching from Southeast Asia to the Sahara — is today facing a unique series of tumultuous events.

 

Getting the timing of an election right can be hazardous for politicians at the best of times. The June 8 snap general election called by Prime Minister Theresa May will, however, enter the annals of contemporary political history in the British Isles as a supreme example of delusional politics.

 

June is turning out to be the cruellest month for British prime ministers. Last June, in trying to put an end to the unending bickering over the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union, David Cameron called a referendum he expected to win.

 

This was supposed to be an election to smooth the way for a hard Brexit with a soft landing. That was before Westminster. Before Manchester. Before London.

 

Once more, Britain goes unto the ballot boxes — for the fifth time in three years. It seems that like rain and queuing, elections have become a national obsession in the UK.

 

The London Bridge-Borough Market killings on June 3 have to be analysed in the background of some disturbing signs in the war on terrorism.

 

The United Kingdom’s relatively strong record of preventing Islamicist terror is now in shreds with what seems to be the third such attack on its soil in as many months.

 

Today, when United States President Donald Trump announced his decision to withdraw from the Paris agreement, he did nothing more than formalise the anti-climate policies that he had been promoting since assuming office.

 


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spotlight image A career diplomat, Chitranganee Wagiswara, High Commissioner of Sri Lanka, is the first woman to be the island nation’s envoy to India. As Foreign Secretary, she was Sri Lanka’s top diplomat for 18 months before being posted to New Delhi.
 
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India has accused the United Nations Security Council and the international community of tending to ignore the terrorists ravaging Afghanistan and their backers while these forces “have stood up against one of the biggest collective military efforts in the world.”
 
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Close Canada-India collaboration in health and wellness is a journey that commenced in 2015 in Toronto, when the first major health summit was held, and ended in March 2017 in New Delhi.
 
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With weird concoction like "Beer Yoga" getting popular as the next big international fitness craze, the ancient art of inner blossoming is seemingly going topsy-turvy. And as yoga hogs the limelight on its third International Day, the loud call for saving the spirit of the ancient and modern practice can't be swept under
 
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The death of deputy superintendent Mohammed Ayub Pandith at the hands of a lynch mob highlights the dangers to the police in Kashmir today, whether from gun-wielding militants or locals disgruntled with the Indian State.
 
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Sher Bahadur Deuba has been elected Prime Minister of Nepal at an especially fragile time in the life of the 11-year-old Himalayan republic.
 
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The rapid rise of Mohammed bin Salman, from one among many princes in the al-Saud royal family to the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia within a span of two years, is an unprecedented development in the history of the Kingdom.
 
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A United States fighter downed a Syrian military aircraft for the first time when it bombed a Syrian rebel faction backed by Washington.
 
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Title: Reporting Pakistan; Author: Meena Menon; Publisher: Viking/Penguin Random House; Pages: 340; Price: Rs 599

 
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  A former Indian civil servant, who is currently a professor of Public Policy and Political Science at Duke University, US spent long periods in distant villages and city slums of India. The result? A scholarly book that presen...

 
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  Title: The Exile; Author:  Cathy Scott-Clark & Adrian Levy; Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing; Pages: 640; Price: Rs 699

 
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Jim Corbett was a British-Indian hunter and tracker-turned-conservationist, author and naturalist; who started off as an officer in the British army and attained the rank of a colonel. Frequently called in to kill man-eating tigers or leopards,...

 
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Title: Bollywood Boom; Author: Roopa Swaminathan; Publisher: Penguin; Price: Rs 399; Pages: 221

 
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