FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Sustaining the Nerve
Posted:Jan 10, 2016
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
There are times when seeking a positive passage through a vexed relationship, ridden with the potholes and baggage of history, requires rare moral fibre. It is so much easier to fall back on the “prestigious” positions of yesteryear and end up not moving anywhere. India and Pakistan find themselves in such a situation yet again, but with the Prime Ministers of both countries having made recent attempts at rapprochement they are now required to sustain their ‘nerve’ and take that process forward. Stuttering, stumbling on their way perhaps; but declining to take the easier way out and falling back to hostile, confrontationist, stand-offs. That “Pathankot” did not trigger another round of customary belligerence is welcome, what is awaited is New Delhi’s assessment/reaction to the outcome of high-level meetings in Islamabad. Having indicated a degree of patience and flexibility when “putting the ball in Pakistan’s court” there is no reason to have sought a “soft” lob that could be easily smashed. The domestic compulsions that provoke strident positions in New Delhi operate in Islamabad too-it would be naïve to expect (as some “experts” do) Pakistan to overtly crack down on anti-India terror outfits, signs of covert pressure on them ought to suffice to keep the dialogue on track. A jingoistic response-which the BJP favoured when it was an opposition party-and calling off the scheduled meeting of the foreign secretaries would be handing “victory” on a silver platter to the terrorists.
 
They would have breached more than the perimeter of the military facility. There would, however, appear to be mature reasoning to the suggestions that those talks be deferred a trifle, preceded by an early meet of the NSAs (accompanied by border management officials?) to plug the gaps being exploited by terrorists and smugglers. The dialogue can be delayed, not abandoned. The “hawks” would be disproving the theory of superior vision if they did not perceive some subtle differences in Pakistan’s post-Pathankot position. It did not come up with a blanket denial, held two high-level security meetings and repeated its promise of “action”. And it has been quiet on the LOC. Is that good enough? It would be wishful thinking to hope that it would accept the Indian “information” as a plan of action.
 
And to be fair, the details being “fed” to the media by the NIA and other investigation agencies are rather far-fetched. If New Delhi cannot rein in its cops and ensure investigations that are more professional and less publicity-oriented can it demand that the police in Pakistan be directed to silence anti-Indian tirades?  Mr Narendra Modi “stuck his neck out” on 25 December, now he must prove “tall” enough not to emulate a turtle when complexities arise.
 
Read more at http://www.thestatesman.com/news/opinion/sustain-the-nerve/115802.html#5co6GWQ3JYSozfiK.99
 
The Statesman, Janaury 11, 2016
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
The first India-China strategic dialogue is to be held on February 22, 2017. This dialogue was proposed during the visit of Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi in August last year and it was propagated as a new mechanism for a more comprehensive dialogue between the two countries. 
 
read-more
The Islamic State (IS)  and its ideological affiliates  in Pakistan have claimed responsibility for this attack and threatened that this is only the beginning of such an anti-Sufi /Shia  campaign to exterminate the apostate – or ‘non-believer’ writes C Uday Bhaskar for South Asia Monitor.
 
read-more
spotlight image India has vital interests in the Middle East and going by the spurt in political engagements since May 2014, the region is a top priority for Prime Minister Narendra Modi writes Md. Muddassir Quamar for South Asia Monitor
 
read-more
The recent violence that took place in Nagaland against the 33 per cent reservation given to women is not only sad, but it would certainly hurt the holistic development of the entire State. The recent violence that took place in Nagaland against the 33 per cent reservation given to women is not only sad, but it would certainly
 
read-more
Society for Policy Studies in association with India Habitat Centre invites you to a lecture in the Changing Asia Series by Dr.Pratap Bhanu Mehta, President and Chief Executive, Centre for Policy Research on Asia: Hope for the Future or Prisoner of the Past?    ...
 
read-more
spotlight image Earlier this week, just after United States President Donald Trump’s top adviser on national security resigned in controversy, a European intelligence official asked a reporter the question on everyone’s mind: “I was hoping you could tell me what’s going on over there [in the US].”
 
read-more
It is high time that Taiwan differentiated its position from Beijing’s claim on South China Sea, writes Namrata Hasija for South Asia Monitor.
 
read-more
At the moment, Nigerian President Muhammad Buhari is able to stop the violence by pushing the Islamists to the vast Sambisa forests of the Borno State At the moment, Nigerian President Muhammad Buhari is able to stop the violence by pushing the Islamists to the vast Sambisa forests of the Borno State
 
read-more
Every year during the budget, many defence and strategic experts start clamouring for a higher budgetary allocation for the defence sector and this year was no different. The allocation of Rs 2.74 lakh crore (excluding defence pensions) is being perceived as “too less”. Every year during the budget, many defence and
 
read-more
Column-image

India remians the inflexible bête-noir for Pakistan, yet there are few books by Indian authors that have sought to interpret the prodigal neighbour in a holistic, informed and empathetic manner.

 
Column-image

The line that Mortimer Durand drew across a small map in 1893 has bled the Pashtun heart ever since. More than a century later both sides of that line remain restless. But the mystery behind what actually happened on 12 November 1893 has never ...

 
Column-image

What went wrong for the West in Afghanistan? Why couldn't a global coalition led by the world's preeminent military and economic power defeat "a bunch of farmers in plastic sandals on dirt bikes" in a conflict that outlasted b...

 
Column-image

What will be Pakistan's fate? Acts of commission or omission by itself, in/by neighbours, and superpowers far and near have led the nuclear-armed country at a strategic Asian crossroads to emerge as a serious regional and global concern whi...

 
Column-image

Some South African generals, allied with the British forces, sought segregation from the enlisted men, all blacks, after being taken prisoners of war. The surprised German commander told them firmly that they would have to share the same quarte...

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive