FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Identifying niche opportunities in an evolving India
Updated:Feb 24, 2015
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
 
Book: “Flying with the Winged Elephant: Niche themes that may emerge in India for global businesses” - By Sourajit Aiyer
 
“Flying with the Winged Elephant: Niche themes that may emerge in India for global businesses” looks at some niche business themes that might emerge in a reviving India for the interest of global businesses.
 
Knowledge First is the corporate mantra of the company the author works for - Motilal Oswal Financial Services (*see Disclaimer in E-Book). The stress is on utilizing knowledge as the foundation for creating growth and building an enterprise, and this thought process was a motivator. Another observation that motivated the author was a speech by Narendra Modi, now India’s prime minister, at Delhi’s Shri Ram College of Commerce during the campaigning for the federal elections in early-2014. He believed that the 21st century could be India’s century. Whenever the world had moved into periods of knowledge throughout its history, India had played a leading role through its contributions in sciences, mathematics and economics.
 
Based on the above observations, the criticality of knowledge for achieving growth and leadership is clear. However, conveying that knowledge is as critical as gaining it, especially when partners are needed to help realize the results. The objective of this E-Book is to identify some of the niche opportunities that might emerge in an evolving and reviving India, why such these niche theme have an underlying rationale, possible solutions to their implementation challenges, some qualitative trends that support the opportunity, and convey that knowledge for the interest of global partners for investments or collaborations. Some of them convey the areas where participation can be sought, while some convey learnings that global businesses might find useful.
 
Most of these opportunities are such wherein India has the resources and talent to build its competitive advantage in the long-term, and that should validate the rationale for foreign investors to make long-term commitments to India. It leverages India not only as a mass-consumer, but also as a mass-producer to utilize global sourcing opportunities into other countries. Some of the opportunities may also motivate India and its critical neighbours to maintain harmonious relations for common economic benefit, and economics can often achieve what others cannot.
 
The themes are sector-agnostic, and include manufacturing as well as services segments. Moreover, most are niche themes that are likely to emerge within broad sectors, and that makes the opportunity more focused for prospective stakeholders. The themes cut across broad sectors like food, tourism, education, media, infrastructure, engineering, offshoring, consultancy, waterways, renewables, housing, e-commerce and retirement. One should also recall that the language of business in India is English, since the legal system is largely based on British common-law. This might make it easier to global businesses, as compared to other peers in the emerging economy universe.
 
The quirky title is intentional. India has often been characterized by the ‘Elephant’ vis a vis ‘Dragon’ for China. India’s evolving socio-economic profile, coupled with expectations of revival, can create niche opportunities. These can boost growth and help the elephant to race ahead, hence the usage of ‘Wings’. The usage of ‘Flying’ is to convey to global businesses that they could benefit from this growth, by actively partnering in these opportunities.
 
For global businesses, the benefits include increased demand for their specialized services, investments into high-growth pools of opportunity, demand for intellectual capital and manufactured inputs, ability to develop products more relevant for India’s cultural specificities, etc. For India, the benefits include business and income opportunities, creation of future assets to assist growth, deepening of export capabilities, and a fill-up to employment and entrepreneurship. Large-scale employment is a necessity, since India’s growth story hasn’t been inclusive so far. Some of the themes may relate to small businesses, but it is these very small businesses that can become large in a growing economy and help expand the corporate base. India’s journey following the 1990s reforms saw several such examples.
 
Indian businesses have also matured, as the recent slowdown made them more adaptable and realigned business models and management practices. The bottom line is – India is evolving and expected to revive. This scenario can throw up niche themes, and global businesses should look to participate in them.
 
The E-book has been published by Libertas European Institut GmbH, a Germany-based organization engaged in economics and political consultancy. It is available in both E-book and Print version from verlag@libertas-institut.com (ISBN: E-book 978-3-937642-53-6, Print 978-3-937642-54-3), and a Kindle version will release soon on Amazon.
 
(Sourajit Aiyer is a finance professional in India. He can be contacted at contributions@spsindia.in)
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
Addressing entrepreneurs, policymakers, technologists, and academics December 7 at the Carnegie India Global Technology Summit in Bengaluru, India's Foreign Secretary S. Jaishankar underscored the need to harness the power of technological change for faster economic development.
 
read-more
The strangest of the several barbs hurled hurdled at Pakistan during and after the recently concluded Heart of Asia conference at Amritsar, India,  was that Pakistan is trying to change perception about the Taliban writes Monish Gulati  
 
read-more
Actually, Modi is on to a long-term experiment in India. He and the government aim to re-engineer human souls and minds as much as socio-economic realities. writes Sudip Bhattacharyya for South Asia Monitor.
 
read-more
This has been a mind-boggling year for Europe. First Britain’s shock European Union referendum result and the ensuing backlash against immigrants seemed to signal the rise of the right in Europe. The certainty that the right was on a steady march to power seemed confirmed by the U.S. election result and was seized upon by right-w
 
read-more
US President Barack Obama’s pivot to Asia, such as it was, is an endangered species in the Trump era. Looking back, was it in essence more rhetoric than a policy to be implemented? Leaders of South-east Asia, East Asia and further afield are asking themselves this question.a
 
read-more
The Heart Of Asia conference in Amritsar called for immediate elimination of terrorism to help the war-ravaged country in its political and economic transition. Access the full text here...
 
read-more
The traditional ties between India and the United Arab Emirates have,  over the decades grown, riding on the strength of trade and investments. The Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan will be the chief guest for the 2017 Republic Day
 
read-more
It is accepted conventional wisdom the world over, ever since well-known military theorist, Carl Von Clausewitz, first articulated the aphorism in the late 18th century that “war is a continuation of politics by other means”.  
 
read-more
Column-image

An aching sense of love, loss and yearning permeate this work of fiction which, however, reads like a personal narrative set in an intensely disruptive period of Indian history, and adds to the genre of partition literature, writes Ni...

 
Column-image

This is a path-breaking work on India's foreign policy since Narendra Modi became the Prime Minister in May 2014 and surprised everyone by taking virtual charge of the external affairs portfolio. A man who had been denied visa by some count...

 
Column-image

The pattern of Chinese actions on the global stage demonstrates that it lives by the credo of might is right, a potent tool in its armoury for the pursuit of aggressive designs, writes Sudip Talukdar for South Asia Monitor....

 
Column-image

The Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan, Lashkar-e-Taiba, Jaish-e-Mohammad and others of their ilk not only destabilise Pakistan and make it one of the world's most dangerous places but also threaten neighbouring Afghanistan and India -- and even far...

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive