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The shocking truth about the ties between Pakistan and the Taliban
Posted:May 12, 2014
 
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This is the story of America’s gravest mistake- of how its most trusted ally turned out to be the very reason it was fighting the Afghan war.

Penguin Books India is proud to announce the publication of one of the most sensational books of the year:
An informed and searing exposé of Pakistan’s involvement in the Afghan war

THE WRONG ENEMY

by

Carlotta Gall

“We may be fighting the wrong enemy in the wrong country.”

Richard C. Holbrooke, U.S. special representative to Afghanistan and Pakistan

About the book

An investigative journalist who has spent more than a decade on the ground in Afghanistan as the New York Times’ war-time correspondent

reveals the shocking truth about the ties between Pakistan and the Taliban.

Carlotta Gall has reported from Afghanistan and Pakistan for almost the entire duration of the American invasion and occupation, beginning shortly after 9/11. In her new book The Wrong Enemy, she combines searing personal accounts of battles and betrayals with moving portraits of the ordinary Afghanis who endured a terrible war of more than a decade.

Her firsthand accounts of Taliban warlords, Pakistani intelligence thugs, American generals, Afghani politicians, and the many innocents who were caught up in this long war are riveting…

More so is the evidence she presents- that the Pakistani establishment has fueled the Taliban and protected Osama bin Laden while simultaneously and duplicitously pledging its allegiance to the United States at the same time.

This groundbreaking story confirms what was already a hunch for many of us- that the Pakistani establishment has actively been supporting the Taliban and has directly helped protect Osama Bin Laden.

The United States considered Pakistan a key ally in its war on terror, yet the true story of what happened behind the scenes is something quite remarkably different from what we have been told. The incredibly aggressive military campaign has left Afghanistan ravaged and affected the lives of thousands.

Yet this book demonstrates how the USA may have been fighting the wrong enemy all along.

About the author
Carlotta Gall has worked for the New York Times since 1999, including over ten years in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

She previously worked for the Financial Times and The Economist.

In 2007 she was featured in the Academy Award-winning documentary Taxi to the Dark Side.

She is the co-author with Thomas de Waal, of Chechnya: A Small Victorious War which won the James Cameron award. In addition, Gall was awarded the Kurt Schork award for international freelance journalism in 2002, the Interaction award for outstanding international reporting in 2005, and was awarded the Weintal Award for diplomatic reporting by Georgetown University.

For more details, please feel free to contact Vaarunya R. Bhalla on vaarunya.bhalla@in.penguingroup.com

 
 
 
 
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