FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Scars of conflict
Posted:Jan 5, 2016
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
If the ethnic and marginalized communities, women, Dalits and Madhesis get reservation in all state mechanisms, why cannot the kin of the security personnel killed during the conflict?
 
It has been 10 years since the Comprehensive Peace Accord (CPA) was signed between the then government led by Girija Prasad Koirala and then rebel Maoists. It is the peace accord that officially ended the decade-long Maoist insurgency that claimed the lives of over 17,000 people including security personnel. As many as 5000 personnel of Nepal Police, 1100 personnel of the Nepal Army and around 1000 of the Armed Police Forces were killed during the insurgency. But the scars of mental and physical wounds of the insurgency still remain unhealed for those families who lost their near and dear ones during the conflict that pushed the country economically further behind and divided the nation on communal basis. The CPA had envisaged forming the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and Commission of Inquiry on Enforced Disappearances (CIED), both of which were formed only last year with a mandate of finding truth about each and every incident related to the conflict and measures of reconciliation within two years. The government has provided financial support and other benefits to the Maoist combatants, families of the civilians and the security personnel killed during the conflict. But the families of the deceased security personnel still feel being ignored by the government though they had sacrificed their lives for the sake of nation.
 
During an interaction held on Tuesday most of the family members, especially widows of the security personnel, lamented that they had received meager financial support and other social benefits not enough to sustain their lives and support their children. Earlier the government had pledged to provide Rs 750,000 in cash as relief to the victims’ families, free education to children of the deceased security personnel up to 18 years of age and monthly allowances to the widows of the security personnel. They have demanded that their deceased spouses should be declared martyrs; their kin should be provided with Rs. one million like others who are declared martyrs and they must be given reservation in government jobs, including Nepal Police, Armed Police and Nepal Army where they had served.
 
The concerns raised by the families of the security personnel killed during the insurgency are valid and the government should take this issue sympathetically. The families of those people who served the nation during the most difficult time should be taken care of by the government which had also offered an attractive financial package to the Maoist combatants living in cantonments. If the ethnic and marginalized communities, women, Dalits and Madhesis get reservation in all state mechanisms why cannot the kin of the security personnel killed during the conflict get the same facilities? The children of the deceased and permanently disabled security personnel should be given free education up to higher level of studies and a certain quota must be spared for them in all government bodies for their well-being. The TRC and CIED may come up with its findings within the prescribed time along with its recommendations to heal the wounds of the conflict. But the government should also come up with its additional package to address their agony.
 
Shot in the arm
Nepal has done commendably well as far as the vaccination drive is concerned. However, there are no rules for this and in the past there were some casualties from inappropriate administering of the various vaccines. Thus, the Bill passed by the Parliament on vaccination making both government and the private sector responsible and accountable to issues related to vaccination should be taken up positively together with the new provision to penalize the guilty with fines up to Rs. 500,000. An investigation committee would decide on what punishment should be given to the erring ones and their vaccination services would be closed.
 
The new provisions make it compulsory to seek prior approval before administering the various vaccines. So far, 11 vaccines are provided free to children and pregnant mothers, while it is essential to pay for the rest. Since many Nepalese are poor, arrangements should be made to provide all with the vaccines that are essential to prevent various ailments.
 
The Himalayan Times, January 6, 2016
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
In direct and indirect attacks on Pakistan for its purported role in providing sanctuary to terrorists and their dreaded networks, the Heart of Asia conference concluded in India with a resounding demand for 'strong actions' against terrorism.
 
read-more
Now Pakistan wants an open war with India to which India must respond with full might so that New Delhi may convincingly defeat Islamabad and the coming decades may usher in peace and prosperity for both the neighbours, writes Dr. Sudhanshu Tripathi .
 
read-more
Of all the nominations that the US president-elect Donald Trump has announced for his potential cabinet, none has received as broad acclaim—nationally and globally —as his decision to appoint Nikki Haley, the first female governor of South Carolina and the daughter of Sikh immigrants, to the cabinet-rank position of US amba
 
read-more
US President Barack Obama’s pivot to Asia, such as it was, is an endangered species in the Trump era. Looking back, was it in essence more rhetoric than a policy to be implemented? Leaders of South-east Asia, East Asia and further afield are asking themselves this question.a
 
read-more
The Heart Of Asia conference in Amritsar called for immediate elimination of terrorism to help the war-ravaged country in its political and economic transition. Access the full text here...
 
read-more
The traditional ties between India and the United Arab Emirates have,  over the decades grown, riding on the strength of trade and investments. The Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan will be the chief guest for the 2017 Republic Day
 
read-more
India had not sought the 1971 War. It was a conflict that was imposed on India by Pakistan and its bumbling generals. In the end, it became — and, remains — the perfect example of  statecraft, with a national leadership displaying the requisite  competence and self-assurance, optimally mobilising the nation’
 
read-more
Column-image

An aching sense of love, loss and yearning permeate this work of fiction which, however, reads like a personal narrative set in an intensely disruptive period of Indian history, and adds to the genre of partition literature, writes Ni...

 
Column-image

This is a path-breaking work on India's foreign policy since Narendra Modi became the Prime Minister in May 2014 and surprised everyone by taking virtual charge of the external affairs portfolio. A man who had been denied visa by some count...

 
Column-image

The pattern of Chinese actions on the global stage demonstrates that it lives by the credo of might is right, a potent tool in its armoury for the pursuit of aggressive designs, writes Sudip Talukdar for South Asia Monitor....

 
Column-image

The Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan, Lashkar-e-Taiba, Jaish-e-Mohammad and others of their ilk not only destabilise Pakistan and make it one of the world's most dangerous places but also threaten neighbouring Afghanistan and India -- and even far...

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive