FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
US Forces in Bangladesh: Some questions
Posted:Mar 11, 2012
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Based on a BBC report The Daily Star, in its March 5 issue reported that US Pacific Commander Admiral Robert Willard at a Congressional hearing stated: "We have currently special forces assist teams -- Pacific assist teams is the term -- laid down in Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives as well as India." The immediate denial/clarification given by the newly arrived but flamboyant US Ambassador Mr. Dan Mozena said that "there is no question of US bases in Bangladesh. US special forces come here often for various purposes and leave. We have cooperation with Bangladesh and it is all about partnership. It is a small team coming and going."

The ambassador further claimed that Bangladesh is "a land of hope" and some people did not share the vision of a Golden Bangladesh and sought to destroy the Bangladesh of peace, tolerance, harmony and democracy. "These people seek to impose their own values of hatred and intolerance on Bangladesh. We call these people terrorists. These terrorists are the enemy of Bangladesh, of America and of every democracy in the world."

The above statement of the ambassador raises many questions in our mind. First of all, we are taken by surprise that the "coming and going" of US forces has never been disclosed by our government. The country came to know about it when the Congressional hearing of the Commander of the US Pacific Forces disclosed this. Is it possible to contain "terrorists" and "enemies" in the country without taking the people into confidence or can the government fight terrorism without carrying the people with them so that people's participation, which is a sine qua non for eliminating enemies of the country, is ensured?

Secondly, it seems that the US government is more concerned about the existence of terrorist groups in Bangladesh than the Bangladesh government itself and its people. The ambassador has been very candid and explicit but our government is not. Why?

Thirdly, are there any existence of such powerful terrorist groups in the country which are threats to America and all democracies in the world as apprehended by the ambassador? If so, why didn't the government share this very important and angerous information with the people? Why have these groups not been identified clearly and taken to task. What action has the government taken so far to destroy them? The people have the right to know.

Fourthly, are there any agreements between the two governments on working together to fight the terrorists and enemies of the country? If so, has it been placed in the parliament as required by article 145A of the constitution?

Fifthly, is it a fact that the enemies of the country are very powerful for which the government was compelled to seek the assistance from America? Who are our enemies? The people should be told and warned about them in clear terms.

Sixthly, the elimination of terrorists and enemies of the country is primarily the responsibility of the Police. Why do the members of American forces come and go and not the FBI or other such organisations including the intelligence agencies. Why combat forces? Who are being trained here -- the armed forces or the police?

Finally, the Ambassador has said that the American special forces come to Bangladesh for various purposes. What are those "various purposes?"

To dispel all doubts, the government should issue "A Press Note" clarifying the position. We should bear in mind that raising a false alarm is dangerous.

Courtesy: The Daily Star, 9 March 2012

 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
Indian Army Thursday annoucned they had conducted "surgical stirkes" across the Line of Control (de facto ceasefire line) in Jammu and Kashmir between India and Pakistan,  in which they neutralised "launch pads" of Pakistan-based terrorists who were, according to intelligence reports, were planning a strik...

 
read-more

Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj's speech at the UN was the equivalent of Goldilocks - meaning that it was'just right'. To extend the porridge metaphor from the fairy-tale, it was neither too hot, nor too cold, writes C. Uday Bhaskar.

 
read-more
The Non Aligned Movement, while holding fast the true spirit of the doctrine of Non Alignment, must act as the vanguard of all principal international debates on political, strategic and socio-economic issues and must also suitably modernize itself to remain relevant in the world, writes Sudhanshu Tripathi for South Asia Mon...

 
read-more
A vast spectrum of the American electorate are simply too ignorant and uninformed to critically evaluate the manipulative messages emanating from demagogues like Donald Trump and his admixture of devious supporters, writes Harold A. Gould for South Asia Monitor.

 
read-more
A conference organised in Singapore on the challenges and opportunities for countries in the Indian Ocean Region, underlined the crucial role of IOR players globally in economic, cultural and political spheres.

 
read-more

English Rendition Of Indian External Affairs Minister, Sushma Swaraj's address at the 71st UNGA, New York (September 26, 2016)

Read more inside...

 
read-more
We’ve seen this movie before — this very scene, featuring this very cast of characters, mouthing more or less the very same lines. On February 11, speaking from a rostrum in Munich, American secretary of state John Kerry and Russian foreign minister Sergey Lavrov announced the imminent ...

 
read-more
Pakistan has been successfully playing the game of psychological salami slicing with India and the world for many decades now. It is like the proverbial child who has been told not to go into the sea, but who takes relatively small steps in the direction that do not singularly amount to disobedience. So he goes to the edge of the ...

 
read-more
Column-image

The book, written in the manner of a series of case studies, also points to the lack of a clearly enunciated national security strategy, a defence situational review, a defence strategy and a joint strategy for the armed forces -- all of this h...

 
Column-image

The book ‘Pakistan at crossroads: Domestic Dynamics and External Pressures’  is one of the few books in recent years which fixes spotlight on various aspects of Pakistan; the internal flummoxing situation and external forces wh...

 
Column-image

In a region which is unexplored as an asset class, performance will be the kingmaker. This book includes the author’s CDCF Portfolio basket for the SAARC asset class, which selects the best fundamental-p...

 
Column-image

Sri Lanka has to be the most beautiful country I have ever seen, says John Gimlette, an accomplished travel writer who journeys to the island nation at the end of a long and brutal civil war. Anyone who has se...

 
Column-image

"Perilous Interventions: The Security Council and the politics of chaos" is an insider's account and interpretation of the West's  "desire for geopolitical domination" which ha...

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive