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Bombing is not solution to war
Posted:Apr 16, 2017
 
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There is no doubt that Afghanistan has been hit with several bombs during four decades of war. But these bombs have never resulted into peace, and still the Afghan masses are desperately looking toward peace and stability. On Thursday night, the United States has dropped the ‘mother of all bombs’ (MoAB) the largest non-nuclear bomb on a network of caves and tunnels allegedly used by Islamic State (IS), which is also known as Daesh terrorist group in eastern Nangarhar province. The Afghan officials have revised the death toll from Thursday’s MoAB attack on Daesh hideouts to 92. US forces in Afghanistan said that the bomb was dropped on a tunnel complex in Achin district of the province. Officially known as a GBU-43B, or massive ordnance air blast weapon, the MoAB unleashes 11 tons of explosives.
 
 It is true that Afghanistan wants to eliminate all form of terrorist outfits, but not at cost of losing sovereignty. There is several other ways to fight these groups, instead of using such a big bomb that could jeopardize innocent lives, and also sustained heavy financial losses. However, dropping of this bomb has been met mixed reaction by ordinary Afghans and also politicians. Using huge bombs is not a solution to terrorisms, instead can cause severe damage to the lives of ordinary people. Such move by US cannot root out terrorisms. Taking in view the capacity of the bomb, which biggest in its form, would defiantly causes collateral damage, smash up crops, human beings and the effects which will be there for a very longtime.
 
 US was once drooped bombs into hideouts of the Taliban insurgents, and also killed several of them since 2001, but still Afghanistan suffering from the menace of terrorism, and the Taliban insurgents still at large. It is not so simple issue that US should escape with it easily. The government has to assign a probe team to visit the area were MoAB dropped. Such bombing could kill many innocent people, and would deteriorate already disastrous situation in the country. The MoAB was tested for the first time, but not in Syria, where Daesh threat is more than Afghanistan, but in eastern Nangarhar. If bomb was carried out only for examination purposes, so it is a very shameful act, and US has to be triggered to court. Moreover, Afghan security official have already said that Daesh terrorist has defeated.
 
 So what was the need for this bomb? It is a show off rather than taking a bold step against Daesh terrorists. If big bombs were the solution to the Afghan conundrum, Afghanistan would have been the most secure place in the world. In reaction to this, former president lashed out at government and the US. According to him, bombing is an insult to Afghanistan and the US is just using Daesh as an excuse, believing that bombing had been pre-planned to test a weapon of mass destruction. It is totally violation of Afghanistan’s sovereignty and a violation of the environment.
 

Source: Afghanistan Times

 
 
 
 
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