FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Will Kunduz fall to Taliban for the third time?
Posted:May 10, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
Heavy clashes are ongoing between Afghan security forces and the Taliban insurgents in areas close to Kunduz city and at least five police and army outposts are under siege by the militants. It seems that the Taliban insurgents have launched a coordinated assault on the city of Kunduz, attacking from four directions and trying to enter the city. The attack has come after the Taliban announced their spring offensive ‘Mansouri’, vowing to continue their evil designs. 
 
Surely, the brave Afghan security forces are putting all efforts together to push the militants back. Kunduz, which fell briefly to the Taliban insurgents a year ago, has seen repeated bouts of heavy fighting. It falls to the Taliban’s hand twice. The Taliban insurgent is making another push to take control of province, where Qala-i-Zal district of the province have already fallen to them.
 
 Kunduz is far from what are often considered to be the center of the Taliban power—the southern provinces of Helmand and Kandahar. But yet the main focus of the Taliban is now Kunduz. They (Taliban) are putting significant efforts and resource in its efforts to take control of the province. Kunduz city is only a province that fall to the Taliban since US forces entered in the war-torn country in 2001. 
 
However, this fallout was for short period of time, where the Afghan security force retook the province, and strengthened their bonds there. However, the ongoing clashes in the province have raised many eyebrows among Afghan commoners. People are viewing with suspicion the intention of government on Kunduz fighting. Many believe that government is reluctant to push back Taliban from the province. Kunduz residents already have suffered at hands of Taliban in the first and second collapse of the province. No room left for them to bear the brunt of other casualties. They (residents) have lost their dearest and nearest one in human resources, while in property they lost almost all.
 
 In twice collapse, many residents were killed and their properties including houses were destroyed partially or completely. This time fall will take out their all earnings the made in the past one year. Government should look seriously to the matter. It is very serious issue. It is not exaggeration, because domestic media reported that Taliban militants are at least 150 meters far from the Kunduz city’s exit gate in Charkhab area which is 1.5 kilometers far from the center of the city. 
 
There is no single doubt on the capability of the Afghan security forces. They (forces) could retake every fallen districts or areas from the Taliban within some hours, but, however, there some problem in command. Some security officers complain of not letting them to attack militants, while they are on standby to thwart militants attack. Security forces should be on attacking position, otherwise, it would not be too far to see another collapse. Giving security forces command of attacking—then see the outcome, which defiantly would be outstanding, and very much appreciable. Long Live to the Afghan security forces, our trustable wings.
 
Afghanistan Times, May 11, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Relations between India and Peru  are united by El Niño and the monsoon yet separated by vast distances across oceans.  Jorge Castaneda, Ambassador of Peru to India, talks to INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS exclusively about what is bringing the two geographically-apart countries closer.
 
read-more
Indian judge Dalveer Bhandari was re-elected to the International Court of Justice on Monday as the UN General Assembly rallied behind him in a show of force that made Britain  bow to the majority and withdraw its candidate.
 
read-more
Those with a resolve make a big difference to the society. They inspire others to make the best out of a bad situation, steer out of morass with fortitude. Insha Mushtaq, the teenage girl who was pelleted to complete blindness during 2016 emerged as a classic example of courage.
 
read-more
Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have "great potential" and they could work together at a "practical level".
 
read-more
This week a major United Nations gathering on climate change gets underway in Bonn, Germany.
 
read-more

Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to build India's global appeal for investors seem to have finally yielded returns in terms of the country's performance in the World Bank&rsquo...

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.