FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
What does Pakistan benefit from supporting militants?
Posted:May 14, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
The recent remark of the US officials regarding Pakistan-based terrorists is at somehow projecting America’s interest in bringing peace in Afghanistan by eliminating their (militants) hideouts in Pakistan soil. A top US spymaster has said that Pakistan-based terrorists groups are “planning to attack” both India and Afghanistan. Islamabad has failed to curb militants and terrorists in Pakistan, Daniel Coats, Director of the US National Intelligence told members of the United States Senate Select Committee of Intelligence during a Congressional hearing on Worldwide threats. 
 
These terrorists would defiantly sustained threat to the United States’ interest in the region. This remark by high-ranking US military official has sent a clear message to the two time-tested friends—Afghanistan and India, aimed at taking actions against these militants in international level— a move which surly benefits Afghanistan. Since long time Pakistan-based terrorists have killed and wounded a large numbers of Afghans. But this time this should be taken seriously. The government of Afghanistan and the people knows that Pakistan our neighbor is becoming jellies when sees Kabul and New Delhi enjoying good relations. 
 
Afghanistan once was known for its functioning as the economic corridor for the Silk Road and other ancient trade routes in the region; still we are on that position, but since Pakistan supporting militants to have bullets in their weapons to continue their irrational war, Afghanistan has less opportunity to focus on economy, and use this golden opportunity. Though, Afghanistan is a landlocked country, but located in a strategic location, connecting Central Asia to South Asia and East Asia to West Asia. The dark side is that militants are at large in Afghanistan. Pakistan is the main reason behind their presence, as they (militants) are being supporting by the Pakistan covertly and overtly. 
 
The country can’t deny the fact of harboring and supporting militants. What Pakistan really looking forward to gain via militancy. Why the country is supporting Taliban, al-Qaeda, Islamic State (IS) and i.e. Afghanistan always had positive intention toward Pakistan, and tried best to mend the rusting ties. President Ashraf Ghani visited Pakistan soon after assuming office, but he frustrated as Pakistan have never renounced supporting militants. 
 
The Afghan government and the people are very much eager to know why Pakistan is hell-being in destroying Afghanistan via supporting insurgents. If Pakistan dreaming to have control on Afghanistan in the interest of spreading its political, economic, and ideological hegemony in the region—it is better for her to wake up form a dream which never come true. If this is what Pakistan wants, so it’s impossible? It is time for Pakistan to put an end to its security dilemma with Kabul and New Delhi, instead destroy militant’s safe havens in its soil. Pakistan has to think that what the country has benefited from supporting militancy. 
 
Nothing at all, but has earned bad name of supporting militancy. Since it is cleared that Pakistan-based terrorist are at eyes of carrying out attacks in two friendly countries, US, India, and Afghanistan should officially send warning letters to Pakistan, asking its high-profile military officials to take serious action against militants, or in case of negligent, serious action would be taken against Pakistan itself. In view of the fact that Pakistan is taking India as its enemy, here is worth mentioning that Indo-Afghan relations are among the few bilateral ties that include elements of civilizational, emotional and strategic imperatives and bonds.
 
Afghanistan Times, May 15, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Housing and Urban Affairs, Hardeep Singh Puri, is a former top diplomat who retired as India's Permanent Representative at the United Nations. In his new political avatar, as an important minister in the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Puri told INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS that
 
read-more
Aimed at consolidating cooperation between the armed forces of India and Saudi Arabia and explore new avenues of defence cooperation, Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee and Naval Chief Admiral Sunil Lanba, visited Saudi Arabia on from 4-8 February 2018, writes Anil Bhut
 
read-more
Campus placement season is here and the news is that graduates from the top campuses in India, especially the IITs, have received six figure pay packets and job offers in the US. However, looking beyond the top 200 engineering schools in India, pay packets are not looking too promising. The reason is the emergence of new engineering sc
 
read-more
Since the NDA government converted the ‘Look East’ Policy to the ‘Act East’ policy, there has been a greater sense of strategic engagement with the ASEAN, writes Gurjit Singh
 
read-more
The UN will be making contacts with Maldives leaders in response to the request by the opposition leaders for Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to oversee the all-party talks proposed by that nation's President Abdulla Yameen, Guterres's Spokesperson Stephane Dujarric said Friday.
 
read-more
Srinivasan leaves his office in Bengaluru where the lights and air-conditioners are switched off when sensors planted inside notice that he is leaving. He is prompted on his e-watch as to how much time it would take for the elevator to arrive on his floor, based on movement-recognition, writes Rajendra Shende
 
read-more

The Indian government is undertaking a project to enhance and install infrastructures related to trade and customs along its northeastern frontier, that include trading points with Bhutan.

 
read-more

Society for Policy Studies in association with India Habitat Centre held a lecture in the “2022: The India We Seek”

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: Do We Not Bleed?: Reflections of a 21-st Century Pakistani; Author: Mehr Tarar; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 240; Price: Rs 599

 
Column-image

From antiquity, the Muslim faith has been plagued by the portrayal of Muslim men regularly misusing this perceived “right” to divorce their wives instantly by simply uttering “talaq” thrice.

 
Column-image

'Another South Asia!' edited by Dev Nath Pathak makes a critical engagement with the questions about South Asia: What is South Asia? How can one pin down the idea of regionalism in South Asia wherein inter-state relations are often char...

 
Column-image

Book: A Time of Madness; Author: Salman Rashid; Publisher: Aleph; Price: Rs 299; Pages: 127

 
Column-image

Book: Why I Am A Hindu; Author: Shashi Tharoor; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 302; Price: Rs 699