FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Why attack pilgrims? The communal designs of the terrorists make Amarnath Yatra a soft target
Posted:Jul 12, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
The first terror attack on Amarnath yatris in 17 years is an act of desperation by terrorists seeking to communalise the Kashmir Valley and the country after losing several men to security forces. The terrorists picked the weakest link in the security apparatus: a bus with pilgrims from Gujarat allegedly plying in violation of CRPF norms to strike. CRPF has stated that buses registered for the yatra move in a convoy protected by paramilitary/police personnel and halt at 7pm. But CRPF must probe whether checkposts allowed the bus to travel in violation of security norms.
 
Intelligence agencies had last month warned of a terror threat to the Amarnath Yatra and more troops were posted along pilgrimage routes. Hurriyat hardliner SAS Geelani dismissed this threat to the yatra claiming that Kashmiris have “always been friendly with yatris”. Geelani and other separatists like Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Yasin Malik have strongly condemned the killing of the seven yatris. But they do nothing to improve law and order in J&K, which allows terrorists the breathing space that security forces otherwise deny them.
 
Hurriyat’s intent and feebleness are best reflected in its attitude to the repeated attacks on local police personnel. When J&K police DSP Mohammed Ayub Pandith was lynched by a mob outside Jama Masjid in Srinagar, almost a full day elapsed before a “moderate” like Mirwaiz offered a half-hearted condemnation. Incidentally, Pandith was part of Mirwaiz’s security cohort when he met his end. The turn of events reflect the loosening hold of the Hurriyat to more radical elements motivated by jihad and establishing Islamic law in Kashmir. Pilgrimages are soft targets for terrorists in conflict zones. The Kashmir Valley’s syncretic traditions still exist but are being undone by decades of conflict and radicalisation.
 
National Conference Leader Omar Abdullah called on right-thinking Kashmiris to say unequivocally – this is #NotInMyName. This is an opportune moment for the central and state governments, Valley politicians, civil society and everyone with a stake in the return of normalcy in J&K to come together. A similar movement needs to happen in the rest of the country too, where home minister Rajnath Singh must ensure that Kashmiris – especially students – living elsewhere do not face misguided retaliatory attacks, while beef lynchings and anti-minority hate crimes are curbed with an iron hand.
 
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Relations between India and Peru  are united by El Niño and the monsoon yet separated by vast distances across oceans.  Jorge Castaneda, Ambassador of Peru to India, talks to INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS exclusively about what is bringing the two geographically-apart countries closer.
 
read-more
Indian judge Dalveer Bhandari was re-elected to the International Court of Justice on Monday as the UN General Assembly rallied behind him in a show of force that made Britain  bow to the majority and withdraw its candidate.
 
read-more
Those with a resolve make a big difference to the society. They inspire others to make the best out of a bad situation, steer out of morass with fortitude. Insha Mushtaq, the teenage girl who was pelleted to complete blindness during 2016 emerged as a classic example of courage.
 
read-more
Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have "great potential" and they could work together at a "practical level".
 
read-more
This week a major United Nations gathering on climate change gets underway in Bonn, Germany.
 
read-more

Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to build India's global appeal for investors seem to have finally yielded returns in terms of the country's performance in the World Bank&rsquo...

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.