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Always firmed
Posted:Sep 11, 2017
 
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Growing insecurity and unemployment have laying down mix consequences among the Afghan youth as brain drain still on the card. The youth that have money or that have sold their properties, decided to migrate for the sake of a better future, despite the fact that such a future often comes up against European barriers. Other youths decided to stay at home, either because they cannot afford to emigrate or because they want to contribute what they know to rebuild the motherland. 
 
Truly appreciable those who stay at home in every ups and downs situation, having dedication to rebuild the motherland. At the same time it is very hard to see people gathering in several places in Kabul, the capital city, for search of job. For instance, every day tens of men gather at Kota-e-Sangi, one of the busiest intersections in Kabul. They fill the intersection waiting for work; they pass time talking and joking over cups of tea. They go through tough situation as from morning until afternoon they wait and breathe in the pollution. 
 
At the end of day, no job for them, and will go home with empty hand. Some of them gets job, but one or two time a week. This is what happening in the capital, leaving the rest. It would not be wrong to say that unemployment is a seed that gives birth to several crimes. A jobless father can do everything under his capacity, irrespective it is right or wrong, to bring bread for his hungry children and wife. A mother would also do the same. Brother will too step into the same shoes to feed his parents and a sister likewise. 
 
Recently, civil activities raised concerns over increase in the number of jobless youth in northern Kunduz province, raising anxieties about their joining of militant outfits. “The people of Kunduz are deeply concerned about the increasing joblessness because the government is doing nothing in this regard,” a civil society activist, Mohammad Qasim lamented. A number of jobless youth had recently increased, Abdul Ghafoor Hotak, head of the youth affairs directorate said, adding “25000 students graduated from public sector universities in Kunduz last year, but only a few landed jobs.” It is hard to get a job after graduation, so that’s why Afghanistan is struggling with joblessness, beside poverty and fragile security.
 
 Not going out of topic, it is the responsibility of the government to provide jobs for graduate students. In the past, there were some reports that vacant posts have been filled before these vacancies to be announced due to widespread corruption and nepotism. One thing is for sure that the government along can’t turn everything right unless the people’s support. So, the National Unity Government would always get Afghan people’s support and we, as an Afghan masses want the government to put an end to joblessness as it is the core reason behind every uncertainty in the country.  Moreover, those youths that still have the love of their motherland and stay firmed to work for betterment of society, don’t leaving the country, one day these efforts would bear fruits. Afghanistan needs youth to cure its pain by hardworking, and the day is not far that these pains to be cured forever.
 
Afghanistan Times, September 12, 2017
 
 
 
 
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