FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Gradually recovering
Posted:Dec 4, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Indisputably, it is not one night affair to turn Afghanistan into a stable state after four decades of war and devastation. It is not easy task, we have long road to recovery. But there is hope and have to put all efforts on card to rebuild our country. Yet, failure is not an option and at the meanwhile it is time to ask searing questions. But before that what our government is doing is truly appreciable, especially paving more ground for young and educated Afghans, noting the fact that they (youths) are the pillar and future of this war-hit country, and be capable of steering the country towards peace, stability and prosperity. But, at the same time brain drain still remains a challenge, and tragedy, despite unemployment and poverty. Lack of access to education is another headache to be tackled and surely insecurity is the biggest defy. Nevertheless, efforts are clearly visible to end this indecision at domestic and foreign level, leaving us optimistic about better future at home. Addressing the seventh Herat of Asia Conference (HoAIPBBaku2017) in Azerbaijan, President Ashraf Ghani stressed the need for regional connectivity and cooperation in trade and transit as well as in the fight against terrorism and ensuring stability in Afghanistan and in the region. Once regional consensus put up, there would be peace and prosperity in the region. It also plays key role in improving economy situation for all. Moreover, Chief Executive, Abdullah Abdullah, while addressing the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) meeting in Russia, called on the member states of the organization to use their leverage in bringing militant groups in Afghanistan to the Afghan-led negotiations table. These are the efforts that underway to change the landscape of Afghanistan from a war ground to economy and connectivity square. Of course we want our motherland to be a center for cooperation, not confrontation among regional and international players, and rivals. But question is that why security situation is getting worse day by day. It is a fact that our brave Afghan security forces have been chasing more than 20 international terrorist outfits that have been supporting by our neighboring countries, especially by Pakistan—the hostile neighbor and long-time perpetrator of cross-point terrorism. It is tough to overcome insecurity, but at least we can reduce it to some level. Economy situation is also fragile. Political clashes are here as well. Trust deficit is higher than anytime among several influential figures of our country, which created a sort of tension for ordinary Afghan masses. We are not sure what will be our future when there is clash between big wings. There is a dire need to promote policies which facilitate non-segregated access to everyone. Indeed the NUG is making efforts to tackle every sort of barriers in the way of justice and equality, and provide facilities to all Afghans regardless of any discrimination. But however, the smell of ethnic tension is feeling here. Though it is very rare, but can be enlarging if not take care of it. NUG leaders, President Ashraf Ghani, and CEO, Abdullah Abdullah, and the National Security Adviser, Mohammad Haneef Atmar have the capability to brush aside all these uncertainties, and the mentioned leadership will embrace support of the Afghan masses in their favor all the time. Time is ripe for the NUG to meet Afghan elders across the country, comprising political figures, tribal elders and civil society to hear their concerns in a friendly, and accommodative manner, and resolve it at first place to defuse, and defeat all sorts of foreign conspiracies with the weapon of national unity, and solidarity. We want unity in diversity at most. Political rifts, status-quo, and anarchy have to be ended as it benefits our enemies only. Hope the government leadership, opposition, civil society and media outlets would play their fundamental, and national role, based on reality and patriotism by realizing their individual, and collective responsibilities to overcome challenges, and serve the war-hit country in the most honest manner.

 

Afghanistan Times, December 4, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Indonesia’s President Joko Widodo has confirmed his presence for the occasion. In an exclusive interview with INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS, Indonesia’s Ambassador to India, Sidharto R.Suryodipuro, reminded Nilova Roy Chaudhury that the first Chief Guest for India’s Republic Day celebrations, in 1950, w
 
read-more
The words of Ho Chi Minh  “Nothing is more precious than independence and liberty” rang true for the people of the erstwhile East Pakistan when, with increasing brutality, the West Pakistani oppression spread across the land, writes Anwar A Khan from Dhaka
 
read-more
In a significant boost to New Delhi's Act East Policy, India and Japan set up the Act East Forum on Tuesday as agreed during Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to India this year for the annual bilateral meeting that would help to focus and catalyse development in India's Northeast.
 
read-more
During an awards ceremony honouring six serving and former diplomats and international civil servants for their contributions to world peace and development, the UN was hailed as an institution embodying the Diwali spirit of good overcoming evil. Among those who received the award was Assistant Secretary-General Lakshmi Puri, who is al
 
read-more
When a rising power challenges an incumbent one, war often follows. That prospect, known as the Thucydides trap after the Greek historian who first described it, looms over relations between China and the West, particularly America. So, increasingly, does a more insidious confrontation. Even if China does not seek to conquer foreign la
 
read-more
The first thing that one sees when a flight approaches New Delhi is thick smog that envelopes the city and its lack of greenery.  In almost all other major cities of India lack of greenery is the most obvious sight that one sees when approaching it by air.
 
read-more

Pakistan has agreed to allow the rupee to depreciate after holding talks with the International Mone­tary Fund (IMF) on the country's economy.

 
read-more

Two major global changes in the past year; the ‘Brexit’ referendum and the advent of Donald Trump, writes Sandeep Kaur Bhatia

 
read-more

It is also imperative for India to explore other regions for markets. Its trade deficit with Latin America has been narrowing. Also, its trade with Mexico, Colombia and Guatemala has increased, ...

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: A Ticket to Syria; Author: Shirish Thorat; Publisher: Bloomsbury India: Pages: 254; Price: Rs 399

 
Column-image

Gorichen, a majestic peak in the Eastern Himalayas at an altitude of 22,500 feet, is the highest in Arunachal Pradesh. Beautiful to look at and providing a fantastic view from the top, it is extremely tough climb for mountaineers.

 
Column-image

It is often conjectured if the reason for long-standing conflicts and insurgencies, in the developing world, especially South Asia, is not only other powers fishing in troubled waters but also the keenness of arms industries, mostly Western, to...

 
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...