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Bangladesh

A Canadian court verdict related to the Padma Bridge (PB) consultancy contact has set off widespread proclamation of vindication of the concerned Government of Bangladesh (GOB) superiors, allegations by the Bangladesh ruling regime of a conspiracy by the World Bank (WB) and Dr. Muhammad Yunus, and even demands for lawsuits against the WB for defamation. This commentary explores if such sweeping reactions are justifiable.

 

Eight years have passed since the gruesome BDR massacre in 2009. The trial is in the process of conclusion, although several under trial BDR mutineers have died during the process, some due to heart attack. 

 

It was once a familiar refrain amongst the restaurant-goers in Dhaka that even if one didn'teat or drink anything in a restaurant, one could still end up paying twelve annas for breaking a drinking glass. That saying embodied concerns over the costliness of eating out and its incidental hazards, but eventually acquired a deeper meaning of life. It implies a Kafkaesque helplessness when one has to pay for something without partaking in any of its pleasures. Almost five years later, the Padma Bridge scandal looks like a throwback to that disturbing despair. Some people may have paid the price without doing anything significantly wrong.

 

Despite the so-called bad governance, how has the economy of Bangladesh been growing at rates higher than those of most South Asian countries? Is this a black box whose mysteries cannot be known? Is this really a 'paradox' or 'development surprise' as perceived by some economists at the World Bank? 

 

Saliha Ben Ali, a Belgian mother whose son was killed in 2013 while fighting for IS in Syria, speaks at the programme “Campaign to Counter Violent Extremism: Learning from the Society Against Violent Extremism (SAVE) Belgium” at Dhaka University.

 

Why do so many Bangladeshi migrant workers get mistreated?

 

The country has failed to do justice to writers like Ahmed Rajib Haider

 

James Robart’s order of last week that put in temporary abeyance on President Trump’s immigration and refugees order, my thoughts turned to the ongoing reconstitution of the Election Commission in Bangladesh.

 

The new Citizenship Bill is self-defeating

 

The Labour Party leader announced that he would force his front-bench team to vote in favour of a government bill to leave the European Union. Accordingly, he imposed a "three-line whip" for MPs to support the bill in parliament.

 


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spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
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A unique and passionate gathering of acrophiles, or mountain lovers, took place in neat and picturesque Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram state in north-eastern India in September.
 
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India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
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With over 100 incidents of braid chopping reported in different parts of Kashmir, there is widespread fear and anger among the people.
 
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As political roller coasters go, there is none as steep and unpredictable as the one shared by the United States and Iran.
 
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In West Asia, the end of one war paves the way for the next. Raqqa, the Syrian capital of the self-styled Islamic State (IS), has fallen to a coalition of rebels, the Syrian Democratic Forces that is backed by the United States.
 
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Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
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Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
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Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
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As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
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Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
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