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On January 10, over 100 people were killed and 200 injured in a spate of bombings in Quetta, which were clearly targeted against the Shia Hazara community. On January 18, a Shia legislator belonging to the Muttahida Quami Movement (MQM), along with his armed security guards, was assassinated. Hardly a day passes when there is no sectarian violence in Pakistan; the targeted killings of persons belonging to rival sects in places like Quetta, Karachi, Parchinar and Gilgit-Baltistan have become the norm writes Alok Bansal

 
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For the past year, northern Mali - nearly two-thirds of the country - has been overrun by groups belonging to Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), the Movement for Unity and Jihad in West Africa (MUJWA), and Ansar Dine (Defenders of the Faith). These Islamic militants have imposed a harsh Sharia law, banned alcohol, smoking and music and forced women to wear headscarves. They have been destroying the Sufi shrines which they consider as idolatrous.It is time pluralist India spoke out and saw Mali didn't become another  Afghanistan writes Saroj Mohanty

 
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The King of Bhutan, Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck, will be the chief guest for the 64th Republic Day of India, on January 26, 2013. With this invitation Bhutan will be the second country whose leader has been invited four times as chief guest on Republic Day. France is the only other country enjoying such a distinction. In 1984 and 2005, King Jigme Singye Wangchuck, the present king's father, was invited as chief guest on Republic Day writes Obja Borah Hazarika

 
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It has long been believed in India that there are elements in Pakistan, especially in the army and the ISI, its spy agency, who do not want any peace between the two countries because, in that case, they will lose their salience in Pakistani society. The latest beheading and mutilation of two Indian soldiers near the Line of Control in Kashmir have been seen as yet another attempt by these groups to derail the peace process writes Amulya Ganguly

 
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The dramatic arrival of a Pakistani cleric, Allama Dr Tahir-ul-Qadri, from Canada where he had been settled since many years created quite a stir though no major upheaval. At least 1000,000 men, women and children joined the long march which began in Lahore and reached Islamabad on 14 January writes Ishtiaq Ahmed

 
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About twenty Afghans from the quasi-governmental High Peace Council (HPC), the  main political opposition parties in Afghanistan, the Taliban, as well as and the Hezb-e-Islami militant group met at Chantilly, fifty kilometers north of Paris to break ice and make way for more meaningful talks between the Afghan government and the main Taliban group belonging to the Quetta Shura writes Monish Gulati

 
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In spite of the shrill jingoism played out 24x7 on the Indian visual media and by a opportunistic political opposition, India’s Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh, took seven days to send a warning to Pakistan over the beheading of an Indian soldier and the killing as well as mutilation of another on the Line of Control. Insiders indicate that the mild-mannered and soft-spoken Singh was “seething” at Islamabad’s stubborn refusal over the week to accept responsibility for the barbaric act writes Rashmi Saksena

 
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Internal security in India is far from adequate, and while this is of immediate relevance for the common man, the larger spectrum of national security challenges also needs to be reviewed in a holistic manner writes C. Uday Bhaskar

 
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The year 2012 saw significant moves by the Thein Sein-led government in Myanmar that helped the country take steps towards finding its place in the global mainstream. These helped break the shackles of isolation that Ne Win had placed on the country from 1962 onwards – and which continued under the SLORC and the SPDC governments writes Preet Malik

 
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Compared to the intensity of exchanges and movement in the preceding years, the year 2012 was a relatively sedate one for Indo-Bangladesh relations. The framework of partnership envisaged during Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina’s visit in January 2010 was further fleshed out during Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s visit in September 2011 writes Deb Mukharji

 


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Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
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  Nearly 58 per cent of the about 600,000 Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh are children who suffer from severe malnutrition, a UN report released said.
 
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A unique and passionate gathering of acrophiles, or mountain lovers, took place in neat and picturesque Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram state in north-eastern India in September.
 
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India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
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With over 100 incidents of braid chopping reported in different parts of Kashmir, there is widespread fear and anger among the people.
 
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According to the National Bureau of Statistics, China's GDP expanded 6.9 percent year on year in the first three quarters of 2017, an increase of 0.2 percent above that of the corresponding period of last year.
 
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As political roller coasters go, there is none as steep and unpredictable as the one shared by the United States and Iran.
 
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In West Asia, the end of one war paves the way for the next. Raqqa, the Syrian capital of the self-styled Islamic State (IS), has fallen to a coalition of rebels, the Syrian Democratic Forces that is backed by the United States.
 
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On “Defining Our Relationship with India for the Next Century”
 
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Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
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Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
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Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
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As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
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Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
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