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Afghanistan

After the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the then Bush administration declared a worldwide “war on terror,” involving open and covert military operations, new security legislation, efforts to block the financing of terrorism, and more. Washington called on other states to join in the fight against terrorism asserting that “either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists.” Many governments joined this campaign, often adopting harsh new laws, lifting long-standing legal protections and stepping up domestic policing and intelligence work.

 

The law is important for a society and it serves as a norm of conduct for citizens. It was also made to provide for proper guidelines and order upon the behavior for all citizens and to sustain the equity on the three branches of the government. It keeps the society running. Without law there would be chaos and it would be survival of the fittest and everyman for himself. Not an ideal lifestyle for most part.

 

After fighting the longest war in its history, the US stands at the brink of defeat in Afghanistan. How could this be possible? How could the world’s sole superpower have battled continuously for more than 16 years – deploying more than 100,000 troops at the conflict’s peak, sacrificing the lives of nearly 2,300 soldiers, spending more than $1tn (£740bn) on its military operations, lavishing a record $100bn more on “nation-building”, helping fund and train an army of 350,000 Afghan allies – and still not be able to pacify one of the world’s most impoverished nations? So dismal is the prospect of stability in Afghanistan that, in 2016, the Obama White House cancelled a planned withdrawal of its forces, ordering more than 8,000 troops to remain in the country indefinitely.

 

Since the beginning of its emergence in 1947,our eastern adjacent neighboring country of Pakistan who was separated by the then colonialism from the main body of British India and was set up beside Afghanistan as a cancerous tumor and in securing factor of our country, has been involved in an undeclared conflict with Afghanistan and for almost three quarters of a century this undefined hostility is going on in different eras in diverse forms.

 

Airstrikes on narcotics processing labs may be forcing the Taliban to seek new ways to finance their insurgency in southern Afghanistan.

 
Traffic remains one of the worst problems that Dhaka continues to suffer from. While the government has taken numerous measures to try and ease Dhaka’s horrendous traffic situation, such as the MRT and BRT, concurrently we also need to work towards making traffic more organised.
 

There would be no disagreement to say that the ongoing conflict is not only killing thousands among our compatriots, but will ruin several generations to come. Pretty sure that the people around the globe will agree on this, while putting glance at war-hit countries and their uncertain situation.

 

The security situation in Afghanistan does not seem to be getting any better. The insurgents, even during the cold weather wherein mostly the situation gets better, have not decreased their activities. There are attacks every now and then in different parts of the country that show that the response to the aggressive US policy has been aggressive as well.

 

The so-called development in Afghan society since the downfall of Taliban has not been even. There are different problems that suggest that development has not taken place in the real sense. Some of the most important factors that define development in the modern sense are non-existent in Afghan society.

 

President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, Mohammad Ashraf Ghani in a gathering underlined the need for countrywide education, through a precise survey to determine the exact number of teachers, their ages and their qualifications.

 


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