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Defence and Security

Recent developments in the Indian Ocean have been a witness to India’s mustering enough political will to advance its regional interests through actionable deliverables, visibly in opposition to mere notional assertions of the past.


In last Friday’s Hiroshima speech, President Barack Obama called for a “moral awakening” on the part of leaders and citizens throughout the world: “The scientific revolution that led to the splitting of the atom requires a moral revolution as well.” 


Fearing that terrorists lodged in jails may indoctrinate and radicalize ordinary prisoners, the Central Government has planned to set up exclusive jails around the country for convicted terrorists and those facing trials in terror cases.


It is the most persistently aired word in the lexicon of the Indian military. It is almost as old as the Republic and has been kept alive on a military ventilator. A handful of retired soldiers routinely invoke the expression in various public fora, to somehow pressure the political executive into creating a new “post” in the already top-heavy high-rise military hierarchy -- the office of a Military Supremo to proffer single-point advice to the Government for higher defence management.


Indian Army chief Gen. Dalbir Singh has ordered a study to increase the ratio of combat troops to noncombat troops with the aim to find more funds to buy weapons.


The Minister for Defence has recently announced the formation of an 11-member committee, led by Lieutenant General DB Shekatkar (Retd), to look into areas of overlap and convergence within the three Forces — the Indian Army, Navy and Air Force. The committee will also identify areas to “rationalise manpower”, examine possible areas of multi-tasking by troops and suggest ways to “optimise” combat potential by bringing in more technology instead of more boots.

The Israeli Spyder system has emerged as the frontrunner for an Army requirement for a fast reaction air defence cover against enemy aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. The Army's short-range surface-to-air missile (SRSAM) programme, which was started in 2011, is nearing final selection that will lead to a contract valued at over Rs 18,000 crore.   

The Modi government has not lived up to the muscularity the prime minister promised while campaigning


India might be better off building an international consortium with the likes of Japan and South Korea to invest in the project


The NDA government has appointed a committee of experts to recommend measures to enhance the combat capabilities of the over 13-lakh strong armed forces and "re-balance" the overall defence expenditure in view of the escalating salary and pension bills.


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spotlight image Sergio Arispe Barrientos, Ambassador of  Bolivia to India is, at 37, the youngest head of mission in New Delhi. Only the second envoy from his country to India, Barrientos, who presented his credentials to the Indian President last month, feels he has arrived at a propitious time, when India’s focus is on so
On February 15, 2017 Indian Space Research Organisation’s (ISRO) Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-C37) successfully launched the 714 kg Cartosat-2 series satellite along with 103 co-passenger satellites from Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota. 12 minutes later, writes Anil Bhat
While most Indians were observing recent domestic political developments; with surprise defeats for the ruling BJP in its pocket boroughs and a likelihood of the opposition uniting against the Party for the 2019 national elections, writes Tridivesh Singh Maini
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping on Tuesday talked over telephone and pledged to deepen bilateral ties and promote mutual trust, writes Gaurav Sharma 
Famous for its pursuit of Gross National Happiness, Bhutan has a new cause for joy: In recognition of its Gross National Income (GNI) growth and social development, the kingdom is poised to graduate from the UN category of the world's poorest known as the Least Developed Countries (LDC), writes Arul Louis
With a dire warning about the looming future of a waterless world, Indian spiritual leader Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev made a plea for mobilising humanity to save the rivers of India and the world before it is too late, writes Arul Louis

While India has regained its position as the world’s fastest growing large economy – with the uptick in GDP expansion at 6.7% in Q3 of 2017-18 – sustaining it critically depend...


A recent novel "Radius 200" by author Veena Nagpal has two facts at the centre of the fictional narrative that she weaves. "Impending water scarcity and the very real danger of an Sino-Indian conflict over this precious resource,...


What is history? How does a land become a homeland? How are cultural identities formed? The Making of Early Kashmir explores these questions in relation to the birth of Kashmir and the discursive and material practices that shaped it up to the ...


A group of teenagers in a Karachi high school puts on a production of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible— and one goes missing. The incident sets off ripples through their already fraught education in lust and witches, and over the years ...


Title: Do We Not Bleed?: Reflections of a 21-st Century Pakistani; Author: Mehr Tarar; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 240; Price: Rs 599


From antiquity, the Muslim faith has been plagued by the portrayal of Muslim men regularly misusing this perceived “right” to divorce their wives instantly by simply uttering “talaq” thrice.