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The killing of Hizbul Mujahideen commander Burhan Wani has changed the Kashmir discourse. Unlike in 2008 and 2010, when the valley erupted during the summers, this time, protesters are exhibiting defiance. They are associating themselves with a militant.  
 

The ongoing street protests in Kashmir have unveiled the new dynamics of conflict. Common Kashmiris are faced with an inescapable dilemma. There is an unfathomable reservoir of sympathy with stone-throwing crowds in streets.

 

The military coup against Turkey's civilian leadership came at a heavy price. With the Syrian crisis rapidly refracting onto Turkey and the Kurdish rebellion reinvigorated in eastern Anatolia, Turkey needs its military in top shape, now more than ever before in its modern history

 

The failed coup attempt in Turkey is not a return to the periodic coups of the past but a warning to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that his overweening ambition to be a modern Ataturk in the 21st century has more critics than he had imagined.

 

Can he junk Hindutva to resolve crisis?

 

The death of more than 30 Kashmiri youths is both painful and inexcusable. Every Indian who believes in democratic values and our constitutional system must feel slightly diminished after the post-Burhan Wani bloodshed. It is no consolation that agents provocateurs may have been at work. After three decades of insurgency, militancy and organised confusion, we should have been wiser. 

 
 

In 2010, Chinese foreign minister Yang Jiechi famously declared, as he glowered at his Singapore counterpart, that “China is a big country and other countries are small countries, and that’s just a fact”.

 
 

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi chaired a crisis meeting of his top ministers and officials to discuss the situation in troubled Kashmir Valley where an uneasy calm has been prevailing since the death of Hizbul Mujahideen (HM) commander Burhan Wani on July 7, 2016 in a firefight, resulting in the eruption of violent clashes between protesters and the armed forces, writes Chayanika Saxena for South Asia Monitor.

 

Even before the shock of brutal massacre of innocents in Dhaka could be painfully absorbed, reports from Baghdad informed the world of a much bigger onslaught by the Islamic State, killing over 200 people. Next was the Great Mosque in Jeddah. In India, a Pampore was already there. Terrorist killings in the name of religion have now become a daily affair. 

 
 

Close on the heels of the Holey Artisan Bakery attack in Dhaka’s posh Gulshan area on July 1, came the brutal attack on a multi-storeyed shopping mall in one of busiest corners of Baghdad on July 3. 

 
 


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Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
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Senior representatives from the US, China, Pakistan and Afghanistan met in Muscat, Oman, on Monday to revive stalled peace talks with the Taliban, but the insurgent group failed to participate in the meeting being held after a year.
 
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Ruskin Bond’s first novel ‘Room on the Roof’ describes in vivid detail how life in the hills around Dehradun used to be. Bond, who is based in Landour, Mussoorie, since 1963, captured the imagination of countless readers as he painted a picture of an era gone by.
 
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India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
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Braid-chopping incidents have added to the already piled up anxieties of Kashmiris. Once again they are out on the streets, to give vent to their anger. A few persons, believed to be braid-choppers were caught hold by irate mobs at various places. They were beaten to pulp.
 
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China has witnessed great historic changes in the past five years from the 18th National Congress of the Communist Party of China (CPC) to the upcoming 19th CPC National Congress.
 
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In a move lauded worldwide, King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud recently issued a royal decree allowing women to obtain driving licences.
 
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Recently, United States President Donald Trump kicked the onus of the US backing out of the Iran nuclear deal to the US Congress. The question is how we interpret this technically, in terms of domestic politics and in terms of geopolitics.
 
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It is a privilege to be invited to this most prestigious of law schools in the country, more so for someone not formally lettered in the discipline of law. I thank the Director and the faculty for this honour.
 
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Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
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Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
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Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
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As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
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Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
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