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China Factor

"This is the time to return to Jalesveva Jayamahe (in the ocean we will triumph). For too long, we've neglected the seas, oceans, straits and bays... We must possess the soul of Cakrawarti Samudra (emperor of the sea)," Joko Widodo, the newly sworn-in president of Indonesia said in his inaugural address last month, outlining his vision of turning the archipelagic nation the world's "maritime axis".

 

Not much time has passed since the BBC online reported the heart-rending news of discovery of 171 people, mainly Bangladeshis, from Thai jungle camps. 

 

It was alchemy, a dark magic beyond human comprehension: the evil-smelling, toxic sludge being pumped out from the bowels of the earth in ever greater quantities was turning all it touched into gold.

 

Australia’s 21st prime minister, Edward Gough Whitlam, has been celebrated in his country since his death on October 20, aged 98, with an emotion that, in India, would place him somewhere between Jawaharlal Nehru and Mohandas Gandhi. Yet, he was prime minister for less than three years.

 
Most economists have a reason to be worried about China's economy -- whether it be low consumption and large external surpluses, industrial overcapacity, environmental degradation, or government interventions like capital controls or financial repression. What many fail to recognise is that these are merely the symptoms of a single underlying problem: China's skewed growth model.  
 

The phrase “Silk Road” evokes a romantic image -- half history, half myth -- of tented camel caravans winding their way across the trackless deserts and mountains of Central Asia.

 

Advances in regional connectivity have generated substantial economic and social gains in terms of growth, trade and people to people connections. 

 

If one steps away from the exigencies of different global crises and contemplates the existential predicament of the two pre-eminent global powers, the United States and China, what strikes you most is their peculiar loneliness. Of course, the US and China are as different as you can imagine. But, despite their power, they are, in distinctive ways, struggling to carry the world with them.

 
President Pranab Mukherjee’s trip to Vietnam days before the Chinese strongman Xi Jinping’s visit to India might seem a carefully orchestrated diplomatic manoeuvre by India. Not really. Visits abroad by Presidents and Prime Ministers are worked out weeks in advance. In fact, Mukherjee’s visit to Hanoi was scheduled well before President Xi’s South Asia itinerary was firmed up.  
 
The prime minister had a good time in Japan. Kyoto is one of its most beautiful cities. I recall sitting around in its gardens and wooden temples, such havens of peace and quiet charm; it was difficult to tear oneself away from them. The city itself is small and friendly; an itinerant tourist like me can walk everywhere. Narendra Modi perhaps saw more in it than I did: he may have been more interested in its Buddhist heritage, and may have connected it with its Indian roots.  
 


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spotlight image Relations between India and Peru  are united by El Niño and the monsoon yet separated by vast distances across oceans.  Jorge Castaneda, Ambassador of Peru to India, talks to INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS exclusively about what is bringing the two geographically-apart countries closer.
 
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Indian judge Dalveer Bhandari was re-elected to the International Court of Justice on Monday as the UN General Assembly rallied behind him in a show of force that made Britain  bow to the majority and withdraw its candidate.
 
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Those with a resolve make a big difference to the society. They inspire others to make the best out of a bad situation, steer out of morass with fortitude. Insha Mushtaq, the teenage girl who was pelleted to complete blindness during 2016 emerged as a classic example of courage.
 
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Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have "great potential" and they could work together at a "practical level".
 
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This week a major United Nations gathering on climate change gets underway in Bonn, Germany.
 
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Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to build India's global appeal for investors seem to have finally yielded returns in terms of the country's performance in the World Bank&rsquo...

 
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Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
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Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
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Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
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As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
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Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.