Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies

Remittances also fuel imports of consumer goods such as motorcycles, smart phones and electrical appliances, mostly from India. Consumption accounted for an estimated 94.7% of GDP last fiscal year, according to the Asian Development Bank. Government coffers benefit from this through customs duties on imports, and from sales of passports to would-be migrants, which cost $100 each. The Passport Department earned $150 million from passport sales last fiscal year, amounting to between 2% and 3% of government revenues, according to Sujeev Shakya, founder of Beed Consult, a Nepal-based business advice group.  

Actors at the helm of Nepal’s political, peace and constitution-making process during the past one decade claim to believe in democracy. Though all of them are not Maoists or Communists, together and unanimously, they have formed a loose but powerful and centralised syndicate that overrules due process, good practices and conventions practiced elsewhere, and keeps many people away from the political process fearing it may lead to the collapse of “progressive politics”. That is the only reason Nepal’s constitution, which completed a year last week, has failed to acquire larger ownership.


After the bloodshed in the Tarai that followed the promulgation of the ‘fast track’ constitution last year left nearly 60 people and a dozen policemen dead, it is once more decision time. The onus is on Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal on his return from India to carry out a second amendment to the constitution to satisfy Madhesi and Janajati dissidents.


If there is one consistent narrative about Nepal over the last two decades, it must be about migration and remittances. Political and development activities in the country have always remained volatile.


On this note, let me identify which Nepali politicians share similarities with Trump, as every country has some political leaders like him and Nepal is not an exception. Several Nepali politicians come to my mind. First comes the Maoist leader (and current PM) Prachanda, whose populist slogan to turn Nepal into Switzerland is similar to Trump’s slogan to “make America great again!” The way Trump doubts and accuses other leaders, I will not be surprised if he gets inspired by Prachanda to reject the election result. 

Longtime Nepal resident Lisa Choegyal has teamed up with noted Indian outdoor photographer Sujoy Das to bring out a unique picture book on Nepal that is a deeply personal account of the country, and how it has changed their lives. Nepal Himalaya: A Journey through Time is exactly that — a story told in text and pictures of the lives and travels of two people through a country they have grown to love and cherish.  

In Nepal, many children enter into so-called love marriages to escape desperate situations at home. But while these are marriages of choice, activists warn the damage to girls’ prospects is as bad as if they had been forced to marry.

This wouldn’t have surprised the thousands of conflict victims who have waited for justice for over a decade since the signing of the historic Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) in 2006 between the mainstream parties and the Maoists, which formally ended the Nepalese civil war. The conflict victims’ quest for timely justice has since been repeatedly stymied, but they refuse to give up.  

Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal embarks on a four-day visit to India this week (September 15-18). The visit will of course have show value, and will re-emphasise the “special relations” the two neighbours share — their common civilisation, culture, religion, and geographical proximity and the close relations people living across the border maintain. 

In a horrific preview of the terror to come, Maoist rebels chopped off the left hand of primary school teacher Narjit Basnet in Rukum in February 1996. Nepali Times  tracked down Basnet, and found him exactly where he has been for the last 20 years: teaching Grade 3 of Saraswati School in Musikot, still cradling his text book in the stub of his arm.  

< Previous ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 70 ... Next > 

(total 692 results)

Nepal’s deposed king Gyanendra Shah has regretted that the country has lost its Hindu identity and said despair and unhappiness among the people might lead them to revolt once again. 


The first India-Palestine Joint Committee Meeting (JCM) signifies New Delhi’s commitment towards economic development and well being of Palestine writes Muddassir Quamar for South Asia Monitor

There has been many nationalist calls for boycotting Chinese goods as a retaliation against China for blocking India’s bid at the UN to designate Jaish-e-Mohammed chief Masood Azhar as a terrorist, following the Uri attacks and the subsequent surgical strikes carried out by the Indian army.   

The most recent polls indicate that Clinton now enjoys as much as a 12 point lead over Trump.  If this proves to be the actual outcome, it could have profound implications for the country’s political future writes Harold  Gould for South Asia Monitor

Since my last visit five years ago I have keenly observed India’s political, economic and social transformation, and welcomed the increasingly active role India is playing internationally. I have also witnessed the growing personal ties between New Zealand and India, supported by our diaspora communities and our education, tou...


Address by M.J. Akbar, Minister of State for External Affairs on Regional Integration and Prosperity at Brussels Conference on Afghanistan (October 5, 2016). Read more inside...

Military aid or assistance, is an important tool, that states have always plied to manoeuvre and counter-manoeuvre other sovereign entities and countless disparate factions in the pursuit of international relations. It includes arms transfers, logistical support and even supply of troops.   

On a sunny morning a young shepherd takes his cattle across the lovely winding Namka Chu into the dense pine forests on the ridge above. The cold wind blows in from the north and the boy looks up at the steep mountain ahead of him covered by rhododendrons.


The Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan, Lashkar-e-Taiba, Jaish-e-Mohammad and others of their ilk not only destabilise Pakistan and make it one of the world's most dangerous places but also threaten neighbouring Afghanistan and India -- and even far...


The book, written in the manner of a series of case studies, also points to the lack of a clearly enunciated national security strategy, a defence situational review, a defence strategy and a joint strategy for the armed forces -- all of this h...


The book ‘Pakistan at crossroads: Domestic Dynamics and External Pressures’  is one of the few books in recent years which fixes spotlight on various aspects of Pakistan; the internal flummoxing situation and external forces wh...


In a region which is unexplored as an asset class, performance will be the kingmaker. This book includes the author’s CDCF Portfolio basket for the SAARC asset class, which selects the best fundamental-p...


Sri Lanka has to be the most beautiful country I have ever seen, says John Gimlette, an accomplished travel writer who journeys to the island nation at the end of a long and brutal civil war. Anyone who has se...

Subscribe to our newsletter