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Bhutan

Demonetisation initiative has not only been a setback for neigbhouring Bhutan's banking system but also hit one of it biggest exports to India — oranges in this season. 

 

Our goal was simple – to better understand ourselves, to become more effective storytellers and to appreciate Bhutan’s unique culture, values and approach to wellbeing. This would play out across a country, described as a hermit kingdom, sandwiched between two emerging global superpowers in China and India.

 

A decade after Bhutan became a constitutional monarchy, the tiny Himalayan country has charted its independent foreign policy vis-a-vis South Asia. Thimphu has made it pretty obvious that its dealings are no longer tied to India’s coat-tails... as they used to be during the long period of its status as a protectorate. Another critical feature is the role of Bhutan’s Parliament, and not the wishes -- often overbearing -- of South Block.

 
While both Himalayan states functioned in a complete autonomous (and often reclusive) manner for centuries, Tibet became a colony of China in 1950. One question comes immediately to mind: how did Bhutan manage to keep its 'independence'?  
 

When it comes to earthquakes, the kingdom of Bhutan is an anomaly. Despite being surrounded by countries regularly shaken by seismic activity, the small kingdom—nestled between India and China—has been seemingly free of large temblors over the last 500 years. Now, by piecing together historical and tectonic records, an international collaboration of European and Bhutanese researchers says it has solved the mystery.

 

In an effort to provide a healthier environment for those living in the Olakha automobile workshop area, the government will invest at least Nu 12M to improve the area.

 

Bhutan, a tiny Himalayan kingdom, is a pioneer when it comes to protecting its environment. A country with a negative carbon footprint, which also is a carbon sinkhole, Bhutan’s constitution explicitly mentions that no less than 60 per cent of Bhutan must always remain forested.

 

It is the only country in the world that is carbon negative, which means it produces more oxygen than it consumes. Bhutan generates about 2.2 million tonnes of carbon annually, yet its forests absorb three times this amount, which creates a carbon sink.

 

Bhutan is the world’s biggest creator of refugees by per capita. In one fell swoop in the 1990s, the country expelled the Lhotshampa, an ethnic group with its origins in Nepal which made up one-sixth of Bhutan’s population, to preserve its unique national identity. More than 20 years on, thousands still remain in camps in Nepal, lost in their own country. This is at stark contrast with the idyllic and homely image Bhutan has carefully curated for itself. As the world looks on at Syria and the deepening migrant crisis in the Mediterranean and concern grows, Bhutan attracts little attention. But as the world finally wakes up to the plight of refugees, it is important that one of the largest refugee populations in South Asia is not forgotten.

 
In recognition for the commitment and efforts made by the health ministry to have successfully eliminated maternal and neonatal tetanus, the World Health Organisation (WHO) South-East Asia Region (SEAR) awarded a certificate of appreciation to Bhutan on September 6.  
 


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spotlight image I am honored to be here today for the first U.S. government exchange alumni conference for India and Bhutan.
 
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The European Union and India should work closely to bring peace, stability and development in Afghanistan, Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades has said.
 
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A pre-dawn  suicide terror attack (fidayeen)  on an army camp in the Kupwara district of Jammu and Kashmir on Thursday (April 27)   resulted in the death of three army personnel including an officer,  while two terrorists were neutralized. Combing operations are in progress to ascertain if any of the attackers have
 
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  It would seem that the government of India has decided to suppress the voices of Kashmiris by imposing a social media ban.
 
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The brief hand-holding took place in the Gulf of Aden. Despite a history of border dispute, diplomatic clashes and rivalry on various issues, India and China joined forces on April 9 to rescue a merchant vessel from pirates.
 
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Mahmoud Ahmadinejad sprang a surprise when he registered himself as a candidate in Iran’s presidential election scheduled for May 19. After leaving the office of President in 2013 at the end of two controversial terms, the firebrand populist has been largely inactive in politics. 
 
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That China strictly implements the UN Security Council resolutions that sanction North Korea is seen by all. If Pyongyang continues with its nuclear and missile tests, China is bound to support more harsh resolutions on this country.
 
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India should be extremely wary of any Trump involvement on the Kashmir issue because he would do anything to bring India to the table, writes Dr. Susmit Kumar for South Asia Monitor.
 
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The core parts of the controversial Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) anti-missile system have been moved to the site of what had been a golf course in southern South Korea.
 
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Health of the citizens and the economy of the nation they inhabit go hand in hand and every buck spent on former guarantees a manifold increase in the latter,  said noted public health expert K Srikant Reddy. The lecture 'Health and Development: India Must Bridge the Disconnect' was ...
 
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Title: Bollywood Boom; Author: Roopa Swaminathan; Publisher: Penguin; Price: Rs 399; Pages: 221

 
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Title: Defeat is an Orphan: How Pakistan Lost the Great South Asian War; Author: Myra Macdonald; Publisher: Penguin Random House India; Pages: 328; Price: Rs 599

 
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  The story of Afghanistan -- of the war against the Soviets and of terrorism that has gripped the landlocked country ever since -- is in many ways also the story of diplomat Masood Khalili, who motivated his people and led them...

 
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Title: The Golden Legend; Author: Nadeem Aslam; Publisher: Penguin Random House; Pages: 376; Price: Rs 599

 
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Over the Years, a collection of 106 short articles, offers us interesting sidelights on the currents and cross- currents in the public life of India during two distinctive periods: (I) 1987 to 1991 and (II ) 2010 to the present.

 
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