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Minutes before, the upscale restaurant had been brimming with life. “I was waiting for my food when they walked inside—young, barely a year or two older than me, wearing jeans and t-shirts. They looked like the other customers. Within minutes they pointed their weapons at us, killed the foreigners and took us hostage,” says Tahmid, a 17-year-old who survived the terrorist attack at Holey Artisan Bakery in Dhaka, Bangladesh.


The attack on Dhaka’s Holey Artisan Bakery targeting mainly foreigners, comes in the wake of violence by a section of Bangladeshi Islamists who have adopted extremist methods to target civil society members, religious minorities (Hindus, Christians, Buddhists, Bahais), Ahmadiyas, atheist bloggers and progressive political activists.


The attack on a bakery in Dhaka — which resulted in the deaths of 20 foreigners — is the most serious in a growing list of attacks in Bangladesh on foreigners, religious minorities and secular bloggers.


Even in their darkest hour, Bangladeshi leaders have refused to rise above the self-destructive political feud that has dominated the country since independence in 1971, refusing to bury the hatchet, refusing closure and most tragically, refusing to stand at the same podium and collectively grieve for the 22 victims of their country’s worst terror attack at an upmarket café in Dhaka over the weekend.


The attack by Islamic State (IS) on a Spanish restaurant in Dhaka’s diplomatic zone of Gulshan late Friday evening exposes once again the vulnerability of the state machinery in Bangladesh. 


Bloodshed is not new to Bangladesh. It was born in 1971 at the cost of 30 lakh lives lost, and has, since then, seen many bloody upheavals. In comparison, the recent string of killings is discrete and few in number.


Gas stations (or petrol pumps) in many countries around the world don’t only provide services to fill up gas or petrol for motorised vehicles -- they also serve as rest stops for travellers as they provide toilets, a general store, and sometimes even restaurants.


In recent years, Bangladesh has made solid progress in reducing mortality rates among children under age 5. Part of its success can be traced to the expansion of community-level health interventions. Accelerated progress will depend on expanded and more equitable provision of antenatal care and skilled birth attendance. 


The licence - allowing preliminary site works, including geological surveys, to begin at Rooppur - was presented to Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission chairman Ali Zulqarnain by BAERA chairman Naiyyum Chowdhury, in a ceremony held in Dhaka on 21 June.


Apparently it was an impeccable scheme; the government would announce a near doubling of salaries for all government employees.


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spotlight image Sergio Arispe Barrientos, Ambassador of  Bolivia to India is, at 37, the youngest head of mission in New Delhi. Only the second envoy from his country to India, Barrientos, who presented his credentials to the Indian President last month, feels he has arrived at a propitious time, when India’s focus is on so
India is the world's biggest importer of weapons, accounting for 12 percent of global purchases during the past five years because it is not able to produce enough arms to meet its requirements, according to the authoritative Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, writes Arul Louis  
India-China-Pakistan cooperation can transform the subcontinent — joining a renamed CPEC would be a good start, writes Sudheendra Kulkarni
Before the independence of Mauritius from Britain in 1968, the Chagos archipelago was separated as part of the “British Indian Ocean Territory” in 1965, and retained by the UK, writes Priya Pillai
Famous for its pursuit of Gross National Happiness, Bhutan has a new cause for joy: In recognition of its Gross National Income (GNI) growth and social development, the kingdom is poised to graduate from the UN category of the world's poorest known as the Least Developed Countries (LDC), writes Arul Louis
Prem Sharma sells gutka (a combination of betel nuts, tobacco and mouth freshener) and cigarettes near the Vijay Nagar square in Indore, the commercial capital of the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh. However, the most visible part of his tiny business is the dustbin that he does not dare to lose. The case is similar with pretty

While India has regained its position as the world’s fastest growing large economy – with the uptick in GDP expansion at 6.7% in Q3 of 2017-18 – sustaining it critically depend...


What is history? How does a land become a homeland? How are cultural identities formed? The Making of Early Kashmir explores these questions in relation to the birth of Kashmir and the discursive and material practices that shaped it up to the ...


A group of teenagers in a Karachi high school puts on a production of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible— and one goes missing. The incident sets off ripples through their already fraught education in lust and witches, and over the years ...


Title: Do We Not Bleed?: Reflections of a 21-st Century Pakistani; Author: Mehr Tarar; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 240; Price: Rs 599


From antiquity, the Muslim faith has been plagued by the portrayal of Muslim men regularly misusing this perceived “right” to divorce their wives instantly by simply uttering “talaq” thrice.


'Another South Asia!' edited by Dev Nath Pathak makes a critical engagement with the questions about South Asia: What is South Asia? How can one pin down the idea of regionalism in South Asia wherein inter-state relations are often char...