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Afghanistan
There is one country in the world that is now taking in more Afghan migrants than all the countries in Europe and South Asia put together this year. That would be Afghanistan itself.
 

Afghanistan was ranked 166 out of 168 countries on Transparency International’s corruption perception 2015 index. Government has often become a self-serving means of enriching the political class. Several politicians have built up business empires that overshadow any attempts to bring about positive change to people’s lives. The political elites have ethnocentric agendas, exacerbate tribal rivalries and political intolerance, erode political will, and increase impunity for the powerful.

 

Despite the continuous deterioration of the security situation within Afghanistan, a shrinking asylum space within the international community and changes in the geopolitical equilibrium at the regional level have recently spurred the return (mostly involuntary) of thousands of refugees and asylum from Pakistan and, in lower numbers, from Iran and Europe. As of September 7th, returns from Pakistan alone account for 98,000 registered and 135,000 undocumented Afghans; additional 400,000 are expected to return by the end of the year joining the growing stock of IDPs.

 

Afghan security forces did well by restricting the terrorist outfit to two districts from eight. But the nation is kept on tenterhooks waiting to find out when the group would be eliminated completely. It is also true that the group has become deadliest and making inroads into other provinces, besides Nangarhar.

 

Few people want to talk about Afghanistan, particularly Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. Yet the central Asian nation’s challenges most certainly will confront the next president.

 

It is quite known that Afghanistan is the worst victim of foreign influence, terrorism and extremism. It is also crystal that Afghan masses are paying the cost for the war that has been imposed on them for several years. More than three decades of war have been killed and wounded large number of civilians and security personnel.

 
Every day that Dil Agha works at his backbreaking job at a brick kiln on the outskirts of Afghanistan's capital Kabul, from before sunrise to well after sunset, he digs himself deeper into debt.   
 

Abandoning Afghanistan is probably not an option, however much western countries would like to wish away the problem. Despite the failure of many rural reconstruction projects, 70 donor countries recently pledged another $15.2bn for the next four years.

 

Last March, an official of the UN’s International Narcotics Control Board said Canada is becoming one of the “areas of greatest reception” for Afghan heroin, according to Business Insider. Afghan exporters also have their eyes on the U.S., where use of the drug is rising. 

 

The Afghan government needs to do more to make civil society a genuine partner. Meanwhile donors should place more value on the grass-roots perspective civil society organizations offer about life on the ground in Afghanistan. 

 


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