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Pakistan

In recent weeks, interesting but competing statements by the PML-N, the army, the opposition and the public on the (im)possibility of martial law consumed much of the prime time.

 

A growing crackdown against social media activists in the country ought to be a matter of deep concern to all right-thinking, law-abiding and democratic citizens.

 

Something is rotten in the state of Pakistan’s external finances. One would think that Pakistan, the home of the flagship project of China’s trillion dollar Belt Road Initiative, would have an overflowing external account.

 

The campaign to have Punjab Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif as PML-N leader has picked up.

 

After nearly three years of state-sanctioned violence during which 465 condemned prisoners have been put to death, any move in the opposite direction is welcome news.

 

After two years, Pakistan has finally managed to secure a seat on the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC).

 

 

While speaking at an event recently, Chief Justice (CJ) Saqib Nisar stressed that the constitution of Pakistan guaranteed equal rights for all citizens regardless of their gender.

 

Pakistan appears to be in the throes of interesting transitions. The NA 120 Lahore by-election result saw Pakistan Muslim League (PML-Nawaz) hold on to its bastion, albeit with a much reduced victory margin, enabling ousted PM Nawaz Sharif to sustain the narrative of being wronged by a biased judiciary.

 

Pakistan’s decision to withdraw terror charges against Hafiz Saeed, chief of the Jamaat-ud-Dawa/Lashkar-e-Toiba, is an outrage, and calls into question its professed seriousness to address terrorist violence emanating from its territory.

 

It may not be a spat, but it is unseemly and needs to be quickly brought to an end.

 


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