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Nepal
Malhari Devi Paswan, 60, looks anxiously at the crowd. She takes a deep breath, and closes her eyes to recollect herself.  
 
With Madhesi parties deciding to boycott local polls scheduled for May 14, Nepal is heading for another political crisis. The boycott decision came after the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist-Centre)-led government tabled fresh amendments to the Constitution in Parliament. Ever since the country adopted the new post-monarchy Constitution in September 2015, Madhesi parties have been demanding a redrawing of federal boundaries to reflect the fact that the community, residents of the Terai area, and other minority groups are in a majority in some new provinces. The government led by CPN(M-C) chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal, with the Nepali Congress part of the coalition, came to power in 2016 on the promise of accommodating these demands to the extent possible and forging a reasonable consensus across the political spectrum. The government had also initiated amendments that went some way in addressing Madhesi concerns, such as the formation of a federal commission to look into a redrawing of federal boundaries, and the recognition of local languages as national ones. These amendments were, however, rejected by Madhesi parties, which stuck to a maximalist position. The opposition Communist Party of Nepal (Unified-Marxist-Leninist) also rejected them, though for being too giving. Unable to forge any consensus, the government came up with the fresh amendments as a signal that it is willing to concede some of the Madhesi demands in return for their participation in the long-pending local polls. But the absence of substantive efforts to address the federal question has resulted in a Madhesi boycott.
 
There is much controversy about Nepal Airlines Corporation’s (NAC) deal with the United States-based leasing company AAR Corp for buying two wide-body  Airbus A330-200 aircraft. The NAC had chosen to buy the two aircraft from the concerned agent at a total cost of Rs. 22 billion.  The NAC says it had to do this through a global bidding process after the Airbus, a manufacturing company, did not participate in the bidding process this time around. The purchase was made by the NAC which would be transferring about eight billion rupees to the AAR Corp next month. This was done without any bond or bank guarantee from the supplier. As per the provisions a bank guarantee is necessary as the per the Public Procurement Act of the country. Thus, the clarification by Sugat Ratna Kansakar, the NAC MD, that according to the financial regulations of NAC, such is allowed without a bank guarantee. But thus purchasing aircraft does not hold water as it clearly goes against the Public Procurement Act. Furthermore, the NAC is a public corporation requiring it to stick to the law and regulations stringently.
 

Although the nation’s current focus is squarely on the upcoming local level elections, they will only mark the beginning of a larger political process. Elections to the local, provincial and federal levels, which will have to be held by January 2018, will be a watershed event, for they will lead to the implementation of the new state structure as outlined in the constitution.

 
The import of banned chemical pesticides must be strictly prohibited from open borders of China and India. Adverse effects concerning food borne hazards ought to be scientifically evaluated and the issues should be addressed at the public level .
 

It is already too much the country has suffered as a result of senseless quarrel over protocol between two DPMs in Dahal cabinet.

 

The entire nation has geared up for civic polls to be held on May 14. The Election Commission (EC) is in full swing preparing from printing ballot papers to photo-based identity cards based on which voters will exercise their franchise to elect their local representatives.

 
Following a summit between China’s President Xi Jinping and Nepal’s Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal Prachanda, Beijing announced $1 million towards the country’s local elections in May.  
 
The Big Three could have gone to Madhesh with Maithili, Bhojpuri, Tharu and Awadhi translations of constitution for Madheshi views on contested issues  If Madheshi Morcha does not come on board for local level (or any other) election, or if they boycott election in Madhesh (specially in Province 2), or again resort to the same ‘colonization’ narrative to foment unrest,  as much as, or more than, Madheshi forces the Big Three—Nepali Congress, CPN-UML and Maoist Center— will be responsible.  
 
The Big Three could have gone to Madhesh with Maithili, Bhojpuri, Tharu and Awadhi translations of constitution for Madheshi views on contested issues  If Madheshi Morcha does not come on board for local level (or any other) election, or if they boycott election in Madhesh (specially in Province 2), or again resort to the same ‘colonization’ narrative to foment unrest,  as much as, or more than, Madheshi forces the Big Three—Nepali Congress, CPN-UML and Maoist Center— will be responsible.  
 


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