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        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Bhutan

We have come to a point in our development journey when the challenges we face demand extraordinary resolve to act, not just with level-headed planning, but also with a sense of greater urgency.

 

Bhutan’s struggle with rampant use and abuse of controlled substances is a national issue. It is no secret that the ban on tobacco has cultivated a black market that law enforcement agencies are unable to crack. Yet, we appear to be in denial.

 

The news that Food Corporation Bhutan (FCB) will continue to buy local rice despite poor marketability is welcome.

 

The monsoon is flooding not just the roads across the country, but also the social media pages.

 

Rapid urbanisation and ever-increasing demand for infrastructure development is pushing agriculture or food production to the backseat.

 

The education ministry relieved 120 teachers in the last five months. Teachers leaving the profession have always remained a concern, but when they leave in the middle of an academic session, the situation is grim.

 

The roar of the monsoon is getting louder by the day. Streams, rivulets and rivers have swollen to dangerous levels. We are yet to witness the full power of the season. Already, we have seen what it had to show us in the myriad ways it does.

 

World Health Organisation’s South-East Asia report on mental health status of adolescent has found that Bhutan has the highest percentage (29.3) of adolescent tobacco users and also the highest percentage (12) of marijuana users in the region. About 24.2 percent of Bhutanese adolescents drink.

 

Something is not happening right in the employment sector. Or should we say, the unemployment sector?

 

Water shortage in a mountain country like Bhutan, blessed with abundant water resources with per capita mean annual flow availability of 109,000 cubic metres, the highest in the region, is probably the biggest ironies of our time.

 


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(total 218 results)

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