FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Global Watch

With Tunisia successfully concluding its first presidential elections under a new Constitution, the legacy of the Arab Spring – which started in this small North African nation in 2011 – can now boast of another bright star. It was in Tunisia that the wave of pro-democracy protests began when a street vendor named Mohamed Bouazizi immolated himself to protest against government harassment and corruption. 

 

During the Cold War era, a Soviet tank once entered Austria at night by mistake. Nobody took any notice of it until it was discovered by a traffic police next morning since it was parked on the wrong side of the road. Soon a joke went viral in Austria. It said nobody would know if the Soviet Union attacked Austria unless they parked their tanks on the wrong side of the road!

 

Apopular joke in Varadero, a Cuban resort with the only worthwhile golf course in the country so far, is that on the windswept par three eigth hole, you need to point to Key West to reach the green.

 

A commonly observed phenomenon is that Germans have two faces. One is apparent outside Germany and the other is visible inside Germany.

 

Interview with renowned Lebanese academic Gilbert Achcar and author of The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising (2013) on the struggle for democratisation in the Middle East and North Africa.

 
The phone call between United States President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raúl Castro, followed by the exchange of an American prisoner for three Cuban intelligence agents detained in the US, marked the most important moment in the countries' bilateral relationship in decades. Shortly afterward, the US and Cuba announced that they would begin the process of resuming full diplomatic ties.  
 
ISRAEL'S relentless settlement-building in East Jerusalem and the West Bank has reached a tipping point. Realising that the creeping annexation of the occupied territories will make the two-state solution impossible, European nations are belatedly beginning to recognise Palestinian statehood en masse.  
 

Nobel laureates gathered in Rome last week were dismayed that Pope Francis had surprisingly refused to grant an audience to the Dalai Lama so as to not incur Beijing's inevitable wrath. Earlier the meeting was to be held in Cape Town to commemorate the first death anniversary of Nelson Mandela.

 
For U.S. foreign policy, its two Latin American pillars have been an isolation of Cuban socialism and support of the Colombian war against FARC. With their unravelling now, vested interests might try and introduce obstacles, but the developments, nevertheless, indicate a decisive shift in the tide of history.
 
Fyodor Dostoevsky writes in Crime and Punishment that it takes something more than intelligence to act intelligently. Those words rang hollow in the report on the CIA torture recently released by the US Senate Intelligence Committee. 
 


< Previous ... 1 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 ... Next > 

(total 726 results)

Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
read-more
Desperate living conditions and waterborne diseases are threatening more than 320,000 Rohingya refugee children who have fled to southern Bangladesh since late August, including some 10,000 who crossed from Myanmar over the past few days, UNICEF said.
 
read-more
A unique and passionate gathering of acrophiles, or mountain lovers, took place in neat and picturesque Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram state in north-eastern India in September.
 
read-more
India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
read-more
With over 100 incidents of braid chopping reported in different parts of Kashmir, there is widespread fear and anger among the people.
 
read-more
According to the National Bureau of Statistics, China's GDP expanded 6.9 percent year on year in the first three quarters of 2017, an increase of 0.2 percent above that of the corresponding period of last year.
 
read-more
As political roller coasters go, there is none as steep and unpredictable as the one shared by the United States and Iran.
 
read-more
In West Asia, the end of one war paves the way for the next. Raqqa, the Syrian capital of the self-styled Islamic State (IS), has fallen to a coalition of rebels, the Syrian Democratic Forces that is backed by the United States.
 
read-more
On “Defining Our Relationship with India for the Next Century”
 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive