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Wisdom Tree
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Rajiv Dogra, India’s former consul general to Karachi, has written a compelling account of the more than six decades old conflict between Pakistan and India. The seasoned former diplomat provides a firsthand account of the fractious relations between the two countries.

 
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The ideological origins of the idea of Pakistan, and the political momentum that led to its creation, still remain deeply perplexing. Creating a New Medina will not resolve all perplexities. But it is arguably among the most important studies of the ideological origins of Pakistan published to date. 

 
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Afghanistan, not Kashmir, can be the issue for India and Pakistan to resume a sustainable dialogue, where it will be relatively easier for them to reach agreement on issues like trade and security while ensuring peace for the "volatile" country , says a regional expert.

 
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Narrated for the first time in this book, are never before published stories by soldiers who fought the Liberation War. 

 
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There is "not much of a literary scene in Pakistan and the infrastructure is underdeveloped with only a handful of English publishers", says author Bilal Tanweer, adding that a few in the Urdu press are doing excellent work but they need more help.

 
 
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For a long time, Himalayan kingdoms remained unaffected by the landmark events of world history. When countries like Nepal and Bhutan opened up to the outside world—the latter still only allows entry to a fixed number of foreigners and permitted television viewing by its people as recently as in 1999—foreigners entered lands that seemed stuck in a pre-modern era. In the case of Nepal, the story is less than romantic and more eventful. Thomas Bell’s Kathmandu is a chronicle of the largest city in the Himalayas.  
 
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Not every individual in Kashmir in the early 1990s turned against the army driven by political vendetta. There were many who rebelled because it was hard for them to accept the killings and disappearance of people they knew.  
 
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Kiran Ahuja’s historical novel, set in the Amritsar of 1900-1940, traces the contrasting destinies deriving from two separate but identical acts of two classfellows, Mohan Rai and Prashant Singh. Through painstaking background research Ahuja provides a fairly faithful and realistic social and political context to tell their stories. 

 
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“Pashtuns are very hospitable and friendly, if you are mindful of their customs and traditions.” — Dr Hassan Abbas
 
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The First World War was probably the last war that soldiers went to with a sense of glory and the feeling that something good may come of it. The war itself was to prove otherwise, particularly as the leaders of the military proved inadequate to either understand slaughter on an industrial scale or to manage the administration and logistics for millions of men.  
 


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(total 142 results)

Review
 
 
 
 
China is yet to reciprocate to India’s territorial concerns on China-Pakistan Economic Corridor'
 
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The possibility of a Taliban attack targeting Emirati officials is not going down well with analysts writes Monish Gulati
 
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Since late 2015, cultural and political issues have strained relations between the two countries with anti-Indian sentiment growing amongst the government and people of Nepal, writes Dr. Binodkumar Singh for South Asia Monitor.  
 
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The recent judgment of a seven-Judge Bench of the Supreme Court barring politicians from seeking votes in the name of religion, caste or creed just ahead of crucial Assembly elections in Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand and Punjab is a welcome step in the right direction. The recent judgment of a seven-Judge Bench of the Supreme Cour
 
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It will also feature glimpses of Indian traditional, folk and tribal art such as Gond, Madhubani and Pattachitra paintings.

 
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spotlight image So the lady’s not for turning. Well, we knew that, didn’t we? Brexit means Brexit, no “partial membership”, no “half-in, half-out”. This was the section of Theresa May’s speech most heavily briefed in advance – but still gloriously welcome to the hard Brexiteers when she finally uttered t
 
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spotlight image It is unfortunate that Taiwan has a neighbor across the Taiwan Strait that wants to annex it, but, even more frustrating, Taiwanese also have to put up with people who echo China’s rhetoric and intended to intimidate Taiwanese into obedience.
 
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Read the transcriipt of UN Secretary-General's End-of-Year Press Conference, held in New York on December 16, here...
 
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spotlight image It is wrong to look only at Israel while fighting rages across the Middle East, writes the former Shin Bet chief.
 
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When is a scam not a scam? The short answer obviously would be, when it is approved by the Government in power. But then, the question arises: Is that necessarily true?  
 
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What will be Pakistan's fate? Acts of commission or omission by itself, in/by neighbours, and superpowers far and near have led the nuclear-armed country at a strategic Asian crossroads to emerge as a serious regional and global concern whi...

 
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Some South African generals, allied with the British forces, sought segregation from the enlisted men, all blacks, after being taken prisoners of war. The surprised German commander told them firmly that they would have to share the same quarte...

 
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An aching sense of love, loss and yearning permeate this work of fiction which, however, reads like a personal narrative set in an intensely disruptive period of Indian history, and adds to the genre of partition literature, writes Ni...

 
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This is a path-breaking work on India's foreign policy since Narendra Modi became the Prime Minister in May 2014 and surprised everyone by taking virtual charge of the external affairs portfolio. A man who had been denied visa by some count...

 
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