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China Factor

Prime Minister Modi’s scheduled visit to Vietnam on September 2 is a good time to touch base with the new leadership in Hanoi. It is also expected that this visit will take the relationship between the two countries to a different level that involves defence, economy, security.

 

Rodrigo Duterte, the new President of the Philippines, gives good copy. Here's a quote from his final election rally: “Forget the laws on human rights. If I make it to the presidential palace, I will do just what I did as mayor. You drug pushers, hold-up men and do-nothings, you better go out. Because I'd kill you. I'll dump all of you into Manila Bay, and fatten all the fish there.”

 
 
Even as the 10-member grouping continues to chip away at breaking barriers and bridging borders, the fanfare to which the ASEAN economic community (AEC) was implemented at the end of 2015 may have fizzled. At this eight-month juncture, it is important that they keep momentum to generate greater benefits for the region’s businesses.  
 
From Britain to Thailand, a referendum can bring about momentous changes in the life of a nation. Comparisons can be odious, when not inappropriate.  
 

There has been a surge of global interest in the Arctic because of its vast reserves of oil, gas and minerals, commercial fishing opportunities, and shortened shipping routes that are now accessible because of global warming. In 2013, India was granted observer status to the Arctic, where India joined China, Italy, Japan, Singapore, and South Korea as a non-circumpolar country in the Arctic Council.

 

The South China Sea is witnessing a vicious downward action-reaction spiral, adding to considerable regional tension. Despite the Chinese rejection of the award by the Permanent Court of Arbitration against China's claims on the South China Sea, its leadership cannot be unmindful of the negative impact on its international image.

 

The unanimous decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague on the China-Philippines territorial dispute is final and legally binding on parties to the dispute under the provisions of the 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea.

 

As expected, Beijing lost no time in rejecting the unanimous ruling of an international tribunal at The Hague that China has no legal basis for much of its claims on the South China Sea.

 
 

The United Nations Permanent Arbitration Tribunal at The Hague has delivered a verdict rejecting China’s claims over the South China Sea based on the Philippines’ complaint. The tribunal’s verdict offers an interesting legal perspective, which indeed holds water. The rationale of the verdict, if not the operative parts, should be acceptable even to the Communist leaders in Beijing. 

 
 

On April 19 this year, in anticipation of an adverse ruling by the UN tribunal at The Hague known as the Permanent Court of Arbitration, that was delivered on Tuesday, the Chinese embassy in New Delhi, as part of a global diplomatic offensive by Beijing, had invited some scholars from various think tanks in New Delhi to a presentation on China’s claims to the South China Sea (SCS). 

 
 


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spotlight image A career diplomat, Chitranganee Wagiswara, High Commissioner of Sri Lanka, is the first woman to be the island nation’s envoy to India. As Foreign Secretary, she was Sri Lanka’s top diplomat for 18 months before being posted to New Delhi.
 
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India has accused the United Nations Security Council and the international community of tending to ignore the terrorists ravaging Afghanistan and their backers while these forces “have stood up against one of the biggest collective military efforts in the world.”
 
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Close Canada-India collaboration in health and wellness is a journey that commenced in 2015 in Toronto, when the first major health summit was held, and ended in March 2017 in New Delhi.
 
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With weird concoction like "Beer Yoga" getting popular as the next big international fitness craze, the ancient art of inner blossoming is seemingly going topsy-turvy. And as yoga hogs the limelight on its third International Day, the loud call for saving the spirit of the ancient and modern practice can't be swept under
 
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The death of deputy superintendent Mohammed Ayub Pandith at the hands of a lynch mob highlights the dangers to the police in Kashmir today, whether from gun-wielding militants or locals disgruntled with the Indian State.
 
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Sher Bahadur Deuba has been elected Prime Minister of Nepal at an especially fragile time in the life of the 11-year-old Himalayan republic.
 
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The rapid rise of Mohammed bin Salman, from one among many princes in the al-Saud royal family to the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia within a span of two years, is an unprecedented development in the history of the Kingdom.
 
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A United States fighter downed a Syrian military aircraft for the first time when it bombed a Syrian rebel faction backed by Washington.
 
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Title: Reporting Pakistan; Author: Meena Menon; Publisher: Viking/Penguin Random House; Pages: 340; Price: Rs 599

 
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  A former Indian civil servant, who is currently a professor of Public Policy and Political Science at Duke University, US spent long periods in distant villages and city slums of India. The result? A scholarly book that presen...

 
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  Title: The Exile; Author:  Cathy Scott-Clark & Adrian Levy; Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing; Pages: 640; Price: Rs 699

 
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Jim Corbett was a British-Indian hunter and tracker-turned-conservationist, author and naturalist; who started off as an officer in the British army and attained the rank of a colonel. Frequently called in to kill man-eating tigers or leopards,...

 
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Title: Bollywood Boom; Author: Roopa Swaminathan; Publisher: Penguin; Price: Rs 399; Pages: 221

 
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