FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Kashmir Watch

The newly elected Chief Minister of Punjab, Amarinder Singh, writing in this paper (‘I applaud Major Gogoi’, IE, May 20) joined the debate about the well-publicised incident in which, on April 9, Farooq Ahmed Dar, a shawl weaver from Chil-Bras village in Budgam, Kashmir, was tied to the bonnet of a Rashtriya Rifles jeep and paraded around several villages, with a placard tied to his chest.

 

The army’s commendation of Major Nitin Leetul Gogoi, the officer who tied Farooq Ahmed Dar, a Kashmiri artisan, to an army jeep’s bonnet and paraded him, apparently using him as a human shield for his troops against stone-pelters, is a troubling move.

 

On April 9, the day of the election to the vacant Srinagar parliamentary seat, a cornered paramilitary unit in Budgam district called the army for assistance to secure a polling booth they were afraid would be run over by a mob.

 

It defies all logic that an Indian army officer responsible for using a man in India-held Kashmir as a human shield should now be commended by his chief for making “sustained efforts in counter-insurgency operations”.

 

It defies all logic that an Indian army officer responsible for using a man in India-held Kashmir as a human shield should now be commended by his chief for making “sustained efforts in counter-insurgency operations”.

 

The various communities of the state of Jammu and Kashmir (J&K) — Muslims, Pandits, Dogras and Ladakhis — have time and again tried to forge a national consciousness.

 

Major Leetul Gogoi, the officer in the eye of the “human shield”storm has trouble coming his way. Kashmir Police, who registered an FIR in the case last month have refused to drop the case against him.

 

On April 9, when Farooq Ahmed Dar, was tied to the front of an Army jeep in Jammu and Kashmir’s Budgam area and used as a ‘human shield’ by security forces, I refrained from writing on it — opinion was deeply divided and I was deeply conflicted. On hindsight, it wasn’t the best course of action.

 

Home minister Rajnath Singh on Sunday said that the NDA government would find a permanent solution to Kashmir.

 

I recently received an extraordinary email from a troubled young Kashmiri in Srinagar. Days before the Indian authorities turned off the internet, Saif (not his real name) had watched on YouTube the 45-minute video documentary Crossing the Lines — Kashmir, Pakistan, India that I had helped make in 2004 and mostly agreed with its non-partisan narrative.

 


< Previous ... 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 54 ... Next > 

(total 538 results)

Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina assumed office again in Bangladesh in 2009, bilateral relations between New Delhi and Dhaka have been on a steady upward trajectory.
 
read-more
  Nearly 58 per cent of the about 600,000 Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh are children who suffer from severe malnutrition, a UN report released said.
 
read-more
A unique and passionate gathering of acrophiles, or mountain lovers, took place in neat and picturesque Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram state in north-eastern India in September.
 
read-more
India’s foreign policy under Prime Minister Narendra Modi has attained a level of maturity which allows it to assert itself in an effective manner. This is aimed at protecting the country’s national interests in a sustained way.
 
read-more
With over 100 incidents of braid chopping reported in different parts of Kashmir, there is widespread fear and anger among the people.
 
read-more
According to the National Bureau of Statistics, China's GDP expanded 6.9 percent year on year in the first three quarters of 2017, an increase of 0.2 percent above that of the corresponding period of last year.
 
read-more
As political roller coasters go, there is none as steep and unpredictable as the one shared by the United States and Iran.
 
read-more
In West Asia, the end of one war paves the way for the next. Raqqa, the Syrian capital of the self-styled Islamic State (IS), has fallen to a coalition of rebels, the Syrian Democratic Forces that is backed by the United States.
 
read-more
On “Defining Our Relationship with India for the Next Century”
 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive