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Bangladesh

At a time when Bangladesh is still reeling from the worst terrorist attack in its history, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s visit carries considerable weight. On Monday, on his way to India, Kerry stopped in Dhaka and met with top Bangladeshi officials, civil society leaders, and youth, sending one unequivocal message: The United States will closely work with Bangladesh to combat terrorism. 

At a time when Bangladesh is still reeling from the worst terrorist attack in its history, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s visit carries considerable weight. On Monday, on his way to India, Kerry stopped in Dhaka and met with top Bangladeshi officials, civil society leaders, and youth, sending one unequivocal message: The United States will closely work with Bangladesh to combat terrorism. 
 

I saw a post on Facebook this week by a woman about how, while walking on the streets, she was subjected to repeated comments made about her physique by a man. It did not surprise me, and it would not surprise anyone, especially women who live in this country. 

 
 
The first full license for an economic zone to be developed by a local private company has just been awarded. The Meghna Group of Industries, a leading conglomerate of Bangladesh, has received the final license from the Bangladesh Economic Zones Authority to establish the Meghna Economic Zone (MEZ). This pioneering zone will be built on 245 acres of land in Sonargaon, on the banks of the Meghna river.  
 

The busiest secretary of state (foreign minister in most other countries) in the world spent a precious nine hours of his time in Dhaka on Monday, calling on the prime minister, his counterpart in Bangladesh, and other top officials.

 

In a brightly lit television studio in this bustling capital city, cameras were ready to roll on a brave bunch of teens hoping their frank debate about taboo issues could help change a country where free speech has grown bloody.

In a brightly lit television studio in this bustling capital city, cameras were ready to roll on a brave bunch of teens hoping their frank debate about taboo issues could help change a country where free speech has grown bloody.
 

At the start of the Rio Olympics, Bangladesh was one of 75 countries with no Olympic medals. Fiji, another such country, squashed its record of Olympics duck when its rugby team won the gold and the country’s first ever medal at the Olympic Games in the inaugural men’s rugby sevens competition. Kosovo achieved a similar feat when double world champion Majlinda Kelmendi clinched the gold in the women’s jude 52 kg category, putting the recently-independent country on the medal table for the first time. 

 
 

This summer, the small country of Bangladesh in South Asia captured world attention. The brutal murders of writers and activists by extremists culminated in the slaughter of 20 foreigners at a café in Dhaka.

 
 

The use of unlawful detention and disappearance has become the tactic of choice in Bangladesh for dealing with anyone deemed a threat, including political enemies of the government of Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina. These practices are a violation of due process and are a mockery of Bangladesh’s laws.

 
Since the beginning of the millennium, the use of digital means to conduct everyday activities has been escalating at a meteoric pace around the globe. As the world becomes more digitised, with billions of people conducting day-to-day activities online, and a seemingly uncountable number of personal information gets stored in the digital sphere, cyber-security has become a priority not only on an individual level, but also on a national scale.
 

Two major power deals were almost finalised, while the darkest café attack in Dhaka ceased all our attention: The formal agreement on Rampal Power Plant and the government’s nod for the draft of Bangladesh-Russia Inter Governmental Credit deal of $11.38 billion for the Rooppur Nuclear Power plant. We have been going through a turbulent period, compounded by political disagreement which we never experienced before since our independence.

Two major power deals were almost finalised, while the darkest café attack in Dhaka ceased all our attention: The formal agreement on Rampal Power Plant and the government’s nod for the draft of Bangladesh-Russia Inter Governmental Credit deal of $11.38 billion for the Rooppur Nuclear Power plant. We have been going through a turbulent period, compounded by political disagreement which we never experienced before since our independence.
 


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