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Defence and Security
India had not sought the 1971 War. It was a conflict that was imposed on India by Pakistan and its bumbling generals. In the end, it became — and, remains — the perfect example of  statecraft, with a national leadership displaying the requisite  competence and self-assurance, optimally mobilising the nation’s intellectual, bureaucratic, diplomatic and defence resources, to accomplish the intended goals.  
 

Pathankot in the Punjab, a strategic IAF base, Uri, a sensitive Army post in the Kashmir Valley, both close to the Pakistan border, and now Nagrota, a major base of the Indian Army deep inside the Jammu region close to Jammu city, all were attacked by Islamic terrorist groups which penetrated, the inner-most security cordons.

 
It does not require the legendary Naval expert Alfred Thayer Mahan to state the obvious: That no state can ever aspire to be a sea power without indigenous fighting ship production line
 

Nawaz Sharif has the dubious distinction of a fractious relationship with all five Chiefs of Army Staff he has worked with, including the three that he chose himself.

 

On Tuesday, General Qamar Javed Bajwa will start his tenure as chief of army staff, the fourth individual in Pakistan to do so in the 21st century. His predecessor Gen Raheel Sharif has given Gen Bajwa an excellent platform to build on, though circumstances will also shape how the chief will be able to proceed.

 

 

Even at the best of times the Indian public remains blissfully ignorant of what happens at the Line of Control (LoC) on a daily basis. Now when the worry is about changing old currency notes for new or catering for the next meal because of lack of new currency, the LoC is far from the mind.
 

Eight years after sea-borne terrorists Ajmal Kasab and gang arrived at a landing point along the Colaba beach to strike Mumbai on November 26, coastal security management across the nine coastal states and four Union Territories has yet to fall in place. Coastal security straddles both military and police roles that make it a challenge for state governments to manage effectively. Today the police forces suffer from political interference and thereby lack professionalism, which reflects in terms of poor public security priorities. Therefore, coastal security can never figure very high on police priorities and proves a weak link in the national security matrix.

 

Eight years after sea-borne terrorists Ajmal Kasab and gang arrived at a landing point along the Colaba beach to strike Mumbai on November 26, coastal security management across the nine coastal states and four Union Territories has yet to fall in place. Coastal security straddles both military and police roles that make it a challenge for state governments to manage effectively. Today the police forces suffer from political interference and thereby lack professionalism, which reflects in terms of poor public security priorities. Therefore, coastal security can never figure very high on police priorities and proves a weak link in the national security matrix.

 

Though the Comptroller and Auditor General of India, in a recent report, was right in blaming defence PSUs for delays in fulfilling contracts and hampering the capability enhancement plans of the Indian Army, the government’s arbitrary regulations are also partly to blame for the stagnation of modernisation of armed forces.

 

It is occasion to examine the missed opportunity of creating a more versatile and flexible indigenous air-mobile artillery from locally available assets. There is still time to rectify the error, writes Cecil Victor for South Asia Monitor

 


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Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image A career diplomat, Chitranganee Wagiswara, High Commissioner of Sri Lanka, is the first woman to be the island nation’s envoy to India. As Foreign Secretary, she was Sri Lanka’s top diplomat for 18 months before being posted to New Delhi.
 
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India has accused the United Nations Security Council and the international community of tending to ignore the terrorists ravaging Afghanistan and their backers while these forces “have stood up against one of the biggest collective military efforts in the world.”
 
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Close Canada-India collaboration in health and wellness is a journey that commenced in 2015 in Toronto, when the first major health summit was held, and ended in March 2017 in New Delhi.
 
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With weird concoction like "Beer Yoga" getting popular as the next big international fitness craze, the ancient art of inner blossoming is seemingly going topsy-turvy. And as yoga hogs the limelight on its third International Day, the loud call for saving the spirit of the ancient and modern practice can't be swept under
 
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AS backpedaling goes, it is unconvincing. Indian army chief Gen Bipin Rawat waded deep into controversy last month when he vigorously defended the army’s violent suppression of legitimate dissent in India-held Kashmir.
 
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Sher Bahadur Deuba has been elected Prime Minister of Nepal at an especially fragile time in the life of the 11-year-old Himalayan republic.
 
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The opposition and media in Pakistan have been crucifying Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif for having sat through the US-Arab-Islamic Summit held in Saudi Arabia in the first week of June, without highlighting the grievances of the Pakistani people.
 
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A United States fighter downed a Syrian military aircraft for the first time when it bombed a Syrian rebel faction backed by Washington.
 
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Title: Reporting Pakistan; Author: Meena Menon; Publisher: Viking/Penguin Random House; Pages: 340; Price: Rs 599

 
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  A former Indian civil servant, who is currently a professor of Public Policy and Political Science at Duke University, US spent long periods in distant villages and city slums of India. The result? A scholarly book that presen...

 
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  Title: The Exile; Author:  Cathy Scott-Clark & Adrian Levy; Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing; Pages: 640; Price: Rs 699

 
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Jim Corbett was a British-Indian hunter and tracker-turned-conservationist, author and naturalist; who started off as an officer in the British army and attained the rank of a colonel. Frequently called in to kill man-eating tigers or leopards,...

 
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Title: Bollywood Boom; Author: Roopa Swaminathan; Publisher: Penguin; Price: Rs 399; Pages: 221

 
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