FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Afghanistan

Last March, an official of the UN’s International Narcotics Control Board said Canada is becoming one of the “areas of greatest reception” for Afghan heroin, according to Business Insider. Afghan exporters also have their eyes on the U.S., where use of the drug is rising. 

 

The Afghan government needs to do more to make civil society a genuine partner. Meanwhile donors should place more value on the grass-roots perspective civil society organizations offer about life on the ground in Afghanistan. 

 

Afghanistan government military and police forces trained and equipped by the United States are finding themselves increasingly challenged by the Taliban outside the capital, Kabul.

 

While the future of the peace process remains uncertain, the hard fact that the government must tackle now is to not just take back the “failed” refugees but also ensure that they are not devoured by the same demon they had fled from in the first instance.

 
We have now concluded the presidential debates. Through three debates neither former secretary of state Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump nor any of the moderators have raised the issue of the deteriorating conditions on the ground in Afghanistan.  The longest-running war in our nation’s history is not even a blip on the average American’s radar.  
 

This October marks 15 years since American forces began a bombing campaign against Al-Qaeda and the Taliban. The next U.S. president will inherit America’s longest war despite President Barack Obama’s former intentions to pull out all troops before he left office. Between August of 2010 and March of 2011, the number of U.S. forces peaked at 100,000. Now 8,500 forces remain. Their presence supports the Afghan Coalition Forces responsible for protecting Afghanistan, as U.S. and international forces continue to withdraw. The political climate is hot.

 

That is the Afghanistan that we all need to support. The endless news round focusing on bombing and fighting ignores the slow growth of a confident people who want their country to succeed. They need help and even if their government regularly fails assorted governance and probity tests, the return to normality is a precious achievement.

 
Today, as the Taliban advance on multiple fronts and the government sometimes seems paralyzed by division, it is hard to focus on that distant point when Afghanistan may be able to reckon with its past and debate how to balance the claims of retributive justice with the society’s need for peace. Despite the compromises contained in any negotiated document, the agreement with Hekmatyar provides a model for others that might bring that day closer.  
 

Essentially, Pakistan has had to contend with a string of inconvenient issues on its western front. With this as the backdrop, this is an appropriate moment to analyse what Pakistan might attempt in order to regain lost ground. This analysis is important not just for Afghanistan, but also for India and the US, both powerful regional actors, who are, perhaps for the first time, on the same page on Afghanistan.

 

Over the past few months, the Obama administration has renewed its efforts to strengthen its position in Afghanistan. In spite of the worsening death toll from the ongoing war, the Obama administration has made a series of new wartime commitments to ensure that the United States maintains a powerful influence over the country well into the future.

 


< Previous ... 1 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 68 ... Next > 

(total 675 results)

Review
 
 
 
 
India's successful launch of putting a record 104 satellites into orbit is a wake-up call for China's commercial space industry which has a lot to learn from New Delhi's frugal space programme, a Chinese government mouthpiece that publishes in English said in one of its rare editorials in which it commended an Indian action
 
read-more
Prime Minister Narendra Modi is expected to visit Israel later this year – a first by an Indian head of the government that comes 25 years after the two countries established full diplomatic ties. The visit, a long awaited one.
 
read-more
spotlight image For a Dongria child, the schooling process not only displaces him of the community and the land but also displaces him from his own way of seeking truth i.e through nature, writes Rajaraman Sundaresan for South Asia Monitor.
 
read-more
Society for Policy Studies in association with India Habitat Centre invites you to a lecture in the Changing Asia Series by Dr.Pratap Bhanu Mehta, President and Chief Executive, Centre for Policy Research on Asia: Hope for the Future or Prisoner of the Past?    ...
 
read-more
spotlight image The sanctions-only approach toward North Korea spearheaded by the United States has been a conspicuous failure, encouraging the reclusive nation to rapidly advance its nuclear and missile programmes.
 
read-more
China bluntly warned that if the 'One China' principle is compromised or disrupted, the sound and steady growth of the bilateral relationship, as well as bilateral cooperation in major fields, would be out of question, writes Dr. Sudhanshu Tripathi for South Asia Monitor.
 
read-more
At the moment, Nigerian President Muhammad Buhari is able to stop the violence by pushing the Islamists to the vast Sambisa forests of the Borno State At the moment, Nigerian President Muhammad Buhari is able to stop the violence by pushing the Islamists to the vast Sambisa forests of the Borno State
 
read-more
Sometime in later half of last year when Indo-Pak tensions peaked, military operation heads in J&K received unusual calls on their landlines. Sometime in later half of last year when Indo-Pak tensions peaked, military operation heads in J&K received unusual calls on their landlines.
 
read-more
Column-image

India remians the inflexible bête-noir for Pakistan, yet there are few books by Indian authors that have sought to interpret the prodigal neighbour in a holistic, informed and empathetic manner.

 
Column-image

The line that Mortimer Durand drew across a small map in 1893 has bled the Pashtun heart ever since. More than a century later both sides of that line remain restless. But the mystery behind what actually happened on 12 November 1893 has never ...

 
Column-image

What went wrong for the West in Afghanistan? Why couldn't a global coalition led by the world's preeminent military and economic power defeat "a bunch of farmers in plastic sandals on dirt bikes" in a conflict that outlasted b...

 
Column-image

What will be Pakistan's fate? Acts of commission or omission by itself, in/by neighbours, and superpowers far and near have led the nuclear-armed country at a strategic Asian crossroads to emerge as a serious regional and global concern whi...

 
Column-image

Some South African generals, allied with the British forces, sought segregation from the enlisted men, all blacks, after being taken prisoners of war. The surprised German commander told them firmly that they would have to share the same quarte...

 
Subscribe to our newsletter
Archive