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Modi's tour to China, Mongolia and South Korea

Outcomes from Modi’s China visit are not spectacular. But they are substantial.

 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s tour of northeast Asia was a geopolitical mood setter. Neither Indian nor Chinese officials expected major breakthroughs. The problems between New Delhi and Beijing were too difficult to be solved in a few days of back and forth. The real goal was to set an environment for future resolutions.

 

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi arrived in China on a three-day visit from May 14. He was given a rousing reception by Chinese authorities. Instead of receiving Modi in Beijing, Chinese President Xi Jinping received him in Xian, capital of  Xi's home province of Shaanxi. His welcome of Modi is similar to the gesture made by Modi to President Xi last September in Gujrat, his home state and not in New Delhi. 

 

The three-day visit has been successfully concluded, but with its fruitful achievements and wide-ranging impact, it will leave a big imprint on our relations, says Le Yucheng, Ambassador of China to India

 

Some quick thoughts on Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi's trip to China.

 

Addressing the Mongolian Parliament on Sunday, Prime Minister Narendra Modi described Asia as a region of ancient wisdom that is expected to lead the world in the 21st century.

 

In his first year of office, Prime Minister Narendra Modi has chosen his foreign destinations with careful thought. After wrapping up his visits to China and Mongolia, Mr. Modi will be in Korea on May 18 and 19 in recognition of the country’s potential importance in pushing the agenda of ‘Make in India’, skill development, employment generation and indigenisation of defence manufacturing.

 

None of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's foreign visits drew as much attention as his three days visit to China. The visit assumed significance in the background of global and regional developments like the growing tension in the South China Sea, US 'pivot Asia' policy and China's aggressive quest to pursue 'one belt and one road' initiative and more specifically in the South Asia context, the BCIM corridor, the vigorously pursued Maritime Silk Route (MSR), the proposed China-Pakistan Economic Corridor and its increasing involvement in Afghanistan.

 

It is not surprising that China’s economic growth and its new leadership in research, science and technology have taken place together. I particularly like the old Chinese saying, “If you think in terms of a year, plant a seed; if in terms of 10 years, plant trees; if in terms of 100 years, teach the people.” In India, too, the ancient saying is “Vyaye krate vardhate eva nityam, vidhya dhanam sarva dhan pradhanam (the wealth that increases by giving, that wealth is knowledge and is supreme of all possessions)”. This is one example of how our two nations are united in their timeless wisdom.

 

The two sides shared the view that President Xi’s visit to India in September 2014 was a significant milestone in the development of bilateral relations. 

 


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