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        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
One year of Modi Govt

With Modi’s arrival, the list of genuinely non-aligned powers has grown from two to four: US, Russia, China and India.

 

A lack of coherence marks the Modi government’s foreign policy, especially in strategic relations with China and Pakistan. Nothing that has been said or done during the past year has reduced differences between India and them

 

Modi government has damaged the rights-based legislative framework without spelling out what will replace it.

 

There is significant behind-the-scenes activity to improve ease of doing business.

 

Modi is a tall leader. Then why does his government sometimes act in petty, vengeful ways?

 

Without shared political commitment, we cannot save farmers from the era of agrarian distress. Time has come to pay serious attention to problems arising from monsoon and market.

 

It is hard to take his measure. All the contradictions of India play out in his persona.

 

The Modi government is determined to dismantle the two-pronged welfare paradigm.

 

Surprisingly for a nationalist party-led government, national security and defence have occupied scant space while showcasing its achievements.

 

One of the major contributions of the Bharatiya Janata Party led National Democratic Alliance (NDA) government in the past one year has been dynamism it has injected to the foreign policy decision making apparatus to further domestic economic agenda and to provide India both the visibility and stature in the global geo-political landscape. The policy paralysis that plagued the Congress led United Progressive Alliance government can be attributed to the political compulsion of a coalition regime and also political dynamics within the Congress party. 

 


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Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Relations between India and Peru  are united by El Niño and the monsoon yet separated by vast distances across oceans.  Jorge Castaneda, Ambassador of Peru to India, talks to INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS exclusively about what is bringing the two geographically-apart countries closer.
 
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Indian judge Dalveer Bhandari was re-elected to the International Court of Justice on Monday as the UN General Assembly rallied behind him in a show of force that made Britain  bow to the majority and withdraw its candidate.
 
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Those with a resolve make a big difference to the society. They inspire others to make the best out of a bad situation, steer out of morass with fortitude. Insha Mushtaq, the teenage girl who was pelleted to complete blindness during 2016 emerged as a classic example of courage.
 
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Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have "great potential" and they could work together at a "practical level".
 
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This week a major United Nations gathering on climate change gets underway in Bonn, Germany.
 
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Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to build India's global appeal for investors seem to have finally yielded returns in terms of the country's performance in the World Bank&rsquo...

 
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Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
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Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
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Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
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As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
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Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.