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Modi's Visit to UK

On his visit to England, Prime Minister Narendra’s Modi’s praise of India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, came as a surprise. In much the same way it did when, at the historic India-Africa Forum Summit in New Delhi, Mr. Modi failed to make any reference to Nehru, who has been described as the architect of India-Africa relations.

 

Economics aside, the spectacle of PM’s UK visit was meant as much for the domestic audience as anyone else.

 

Beyond a reiteration of good intentions, little was achieved. Neither past difficulties were resolved nor future opportunities concretised.

 

Of the about 30 countries Narendra Modi has visited as Prime Minister, he has addressed big public rallies in seven.

 

Outside the Hindu temple in Neasden, north-west London — the biggest outside India when it was built in 1995 — there is a palpable sense of excitement. Marquees are being erected, the overspill car park is filling and broadcast vans are idling.

 

The Prime Minister’s NRI outreach through massive arena functions is his leitmotif. The journey from New York City’s Madison Square Gardens to London’s Wembley Stadium shows the varied effects of engaging a more politically involved diaspora It is 2 a.m. on the night before Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s address at Wembley Stadium, 30-year-old Mayuri Parmar has no expectation of getting any sleep. 

 

British Prime Minister David Cameron introduced his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi at the packed Wembley stadium on Friday. Speaking before 70,000-strong crowd, Cameron chose to repeat Modi's 2014 poll slogan "Acche din anewalein hain", and added, "acche din zaroor aayega."

 

Britain and India welcomed more than £9 billion in commercial deals during PM Narendra Modi's three-day visit to UK. Modi got a warm welcome from British PM David Cameron, their parleys continuing on Friday, after which PM Modi had lunch with the Queen before his address to an expected 60,000-strong crowd at Wembley. 

 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi invoked India's traditions of "Ram and Rahim" to stress that inclusive beliefs like Sufism had helped create a harmonious society as he addressed a packed public event at Wembley Stadium, where his British counterpart David Cameron hailed the moment saying he was sure "achhe din zaroor aayenge". 

 

David Cameron has swept aside criticism of his decision to offer a lavish reception for the Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, as he hailed his enormous mandate from the people of India.

 


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