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SAARC @ 30

Once Pakistan tames the snakes in its backyard, as Hillary Clinton once described the jehadis, peace can return to the subcontinent after a long absence from the time of the 1947 partition, writes Amulya Ganguli for South Asia Monitor

 

Trade routes through Afghanistan to Central Asia can only be feasible if there is peace in the region and international observers believe that if Pakistan, India and Afghanistan work in tandem then the marginalised terrorist outfits can be eradicated sooner or later

 

The India-Pakistan dialogue has picked up steam. Meetings have been agreed with impressive precision. 

 

As “go to Pakistan” quickly went from curse to foreign policy initiative, we woke up to find India’s foreign minister in Islamabad, rather than all those “Modi-baiters” and “beef-eaters”. It is a good moment to recap what has comprised a policy on the western neighbour all these months that this BJP-led government has been in charge in New Delhi.

 

External Affairs Minister (EAM) Sushma Swaraj’s visit to Islamabad, where she announced the resumption of dialogue between India and Pakistan, is amongst the most dramatic announcements made by the Narendra Modi government so far.

 

In the euphoria that followed the announcement about a new dialogue process between India and Pakistan, many would have missed out on a key development – a place at the negotiating table for the Pakistani military.

 

India’s re-engagement with Pakistan has been as dramatic as recent instances of bilateral discord. Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his counterpart Nawaz Sharif have surprised constituents, just as the latter were getting reconciled to a prolonged hiatus and the sense that both sides will settle into a state of mutual avoidance.

 

The agreement by India and Pakistan to resume structured talks, seven years after the composite dialogue was stopped following the Mumbai terrorist attacks, marks a dramatic improvement in bilateral relations.

 

Afghanistan has been conducting its foreign trade largely through Pakistan and could facilitate Pakistan for its trade with Central Asia and, more importantly, for bringing electricity and gas from Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan into South Asia

 

It’s fashionable to want to be a celebrity: To be followed, photographed, documented, deconstructed and talked about incessantly. This is partly because the rewards of being well-known can be numerous, but mainly because the world has self-esteem issues (and their name is Kardashian). 

 


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Indian judge Dalveer Bhandari was re-elected to the International Court of Justice on Monday as the UN General Assembly rallied behind him in a show of force that made Britain  bow to the majority and withdraw its candidate.
 
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Those with a resolve make a big difference to the society. They inspire others to make the best out of a bad situation, steer out of morass with fortitude. Insha Mushtaq, the teenage girl who was pelleted to complete blindness during 2016 emerged as a classic example of courage.
 
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Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have "great potential" and they could work together at a "practical level".
 
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This week a major United Nations gathering on climate change gets underway in Bonn, Germany.
 
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Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to build India's global appeal for investors seem to have finally yielded returns in terms of the country's performance in the World Bank&rsquo...

 
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Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
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Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
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Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
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As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
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Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.