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Pathankot fallout for Peace Talks

The view among the strategic community in India is divided over the sincerity of Pakistan and its responses in approaching the cases to try those who have been involved in attacking the Indian soil from time to time. However, the recent happenings in Pakistan as a response to the Pathankot terror attack have come across as a ray of hope, writes Brig, Anil Gupta (Retd.) for South Asia Monitor.

 

The Pakistani deep state’s complicity in the Pathankot attack established, ‘yo-yo diplomacy’ will yield no tangible outcomes for India. The government must focus on building military capacity along the border and wait it out before returning to a step-by-step normalisation process

 

The attack on the Pathankot airbase by terrorists from Pakistan has once again proven that those actually controlling the reins of the country do not want peace with India. The theory that strong Pakistan is in interest of India is outdated and erroneous; India must give it back to Pakistan in the same coin, writes Jai Kumar Verma for South Asia Monitor.

 

The Indian home ministry’s zealous protection of its sprawling turf with a plethora of spook, intelligence and security agencies under its control might have unwittingly become the biggest hurdle in the execution of measures at Pathankot, writes Sudip Talukdar for South Asia Monitor.

 

The terror attack on the airbase in Pathankot, reportedly carried out by the Jaish-e-Muhammad, has raised several questions about how to respond to such attacks. The extended time taken by the security forces to neutralise the attack and secure the area as well as the losses suffered by them — seven lives were lost on the Indian side — has led to a clamour for the need to have the ability to respond more swiftly.

 

In the recent history of relations between India and Pakistan, it has seemed an immutable law: that any apparent political breakthrough will be followed by a terrorist atrocity in India blamed on agents of the Pakistan state.” Further, “to call off the dialogue gives the terrorists what they want”.

 

The received wisdom in India (and perhaps the world) in recent years has it that spoilers of the peace process with Pakistan emanate from the latter’s soil.

 

We will not allow our soil to be used against any other country for terrorism.’ This oft-repeated cliché in Pakistan’s official statements has almost become a national embarrassment.

 

Talk we must, but for any dialogue with Pakistan to be successful, New Delhi will have to be sensitive to Nawaz Sharif’s imperative that it be seen as a win-win outcome for both sides.

 

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s birthday surprise visit to Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and his informal chat at Jati Umra put back on the track the stalled process of dialogue between India and Pakistan.

 


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