FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Pathankot fallout for Peace Talks

The view among the strategic community in India is divided over the sincerity of Pakistan and its responses in approaching the cases to try those who have been involved in attacking the Indian soil from time to time. However, the recent happenings in Pakistan as a response to the Pathankot terror attack have come across as a ray of hope, writes Brig, Anil Gupta (Retd.) for South Asia Monitor.

 

The Pakistani deep state’s complicity in the Pathankot attack established, ‘yo-yo diplomacy’ will yield no tangible outcomes for India. The government must focus on building military capacity along the border and wait it out before returning to a step-by-step normalisation process

 

The attack on the Pathankot airbase by terrorists from Pakistan has once again proven that those actually controlling the reins of the country do not want peace with India. The theory that strong Pakistan is in interest of India is outdated and erroneous; India must give it back to Pakistan in the same coin, writes Jai Kumar Verma for South Asia Monitor.

 

The Indian home ministry’s zealous protection of its sprawling turf with a plethora of spook, intelligence and security agencies under its control might have unwittingly become the biggest hurdle in the execution of measures at Pathankot, writes Sudip Talukdar for South Asia Monitor.

 

The terror attack on the airbase in Pathankot, reportedly carried out by the Jaish-e-Muhammad, has raised several questions about how to respond to such attacks. The extended time taken by the security forces to neutralise the attack and secure the area as well as the losses suffered by them — seven lives were lost on the Indian side — has led to a clamour for the need to have the ability to respond more swiftly.

 

In the recent history of relations between India and Pakistan, it has seemed an immutable law: that any apparent political breakthrough will be followed by a terrorist atrocity in India blamed on agents of the Pakistan state.” Further, “to call off the dialogue gives the terrorists what they want”.

 

The received wisdom in India (and perhaps the world) in recent years has it that spoilers of the peace process with Pakistan emanate from the latter’s soil.

 

We will not allow our soil to be used against any other country for terrorism.’ This oft-repeated cliché in Pakistan’s official statements has almost become a national embarrassment.

 

Talk we must, but for any dialogue with Pakistan to be successful, New Delhi will have to be sensitive to Nawaz Sharif’s imperative that it be seen as a win-win outcome for both sides.

 

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s birthday surprise visit to Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and his informal chat at Jati Umra put back on the track the stalled process of dialogue between India and Pakistan.

 


< Previous 1 2 3 4 5 ... Next > 

(total 46 results)

Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Relations between India and Peru  are united by El Niño and the monsoon yet separated by vast distances across oceans.  Jorge Castaneda, Ambassador of Peru to India, talks to INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS exclusively about what is bringing the two geographically-apart countries closer.
 
read-more
Indian judge Dalveer Bhandari was re-elected to the International Court of Justice on Monday as the UN General Assembly rallied behind him in a show of force that made Britain  bow to the majority and withdraw its candidate.
 
read-more
Those with a resolve make a big difference to the society. They inspire others to make the best out of a bad situation, steer out of morass with fortitude. Insha Mushtaq, the teenage girl who was pelleted to complete blindness during 2016 emerged as a classic example of courage.
 
read-more
Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have "great potential" and they could work together at a "practical level".
 
read-more
This week a major United Nations gathering on climate change gets underway in Bonn, Germany.
 
read-more

Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to build India's global appeal for investors seem to have finally yielded returns in terms of the country's performance in the World Bank&rsquo...

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.