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Alliance after alliance
Posted:Jul 18, 2017
 
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It is legal right of the political parties and figures to create alliance amid at betterment of society, and also to push their agendas temporarily or permanently. The duty of formed alliance is to support and protect the advance progress made in the past years—also not to take their interests above national. 
 
To a certain extent, coalition parties have to work amid at convincing the incumbent government to bring reform, or correct blunders that at somehow marred development of the country. The alliance leaders should apply their agendas in such a way to amplify the poor Afghan voices in discussions with the high-ranking government officials, and support their aspirations for further political and economic development and the protection of basic human rights. In Afghanistan the trend of collation-making has been kicked off. 
 
There was in the past, but in these days it’s like cup of tea. Afghan masses, especially those have access to the social media are in confusing loom as they witnessed two alliances announcement in less than one month. One of social users said that smiling face toward some political figures doesn’t indicate to create alliance. Every politician who sees five people in their support—envisages of having immense prop up, and next day jumps to create a political collation. It is also a fact that new opposition alliances and groupings are the result of growing disappointment with the leadership of the National Unity Government (NUG). 
 
After noting that NUG is going on wrong direction, the Council for the Protection and Stability of Afghanistan—the first government opposition announced its existence at first place. The council is seeking a prominent role of former holy warriors in the war against terrorism, organization of Loya Jirga and elections. Moreover, Jamiat Islami (JI) President Salahuddin Rabbani, Atta Mohammad Noor provincial governor of Balkh province, Deputy Chief Executive Officer Mohammad Mohaqiq recently met First Vice President Abdul Rashid Dostum in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey. Soon after meeting, they announced a new political alliance named “High Council of Coalition for Salvation of Afghanistan”. 
 
The three parties issued a joint statement, saying the alliance was aimed to counter the illegal acts of the government, prevent the system’s disruption, political chaos and restore public confidence. In another step to pressures the NUG over its failure, the Mehwar-i-Mrdum Afghanistan is another political alliance announced its existence recently. On the other hand, such coalition earned mixed reaction. Some welcomed, while others termed such alliance just to fill their bank balance.
 
 It is irrefutable that NUG leaders failed in several fronts, including honoring campaign pledges. At the same time, making collation is not rational way to get rid of problems. For instance, in US, there are two political parties, while in Afghanistan that we have less than 30 million populations, there are several political parties. First, big political parties should bring small one under their wings. Two or three political parties are quite enough. Surly, this would lead Afghanistan toward peace and stability. All political parties have to come under one roof to find solution to the current challenges, instead of forming coalition separately.
 
Afghanistan Times, July 19, 2017
 
 
 
 
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