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Asian nations should place China on notice
Posted:Jul 11, 2017
 
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By N S Venkataraman 
 
It is becoming increasingly obvious that China is experiencing a sort of superiority obsession, imagining it can dominate and conquer the world. Several Chinese acts in the recent past indicate such an attitude. Asian nations, which are now apprehensive about China’s aggressive postures, are unclear how matters will shape up.
 
China entered and occupied Tibet, claiming the peaceful country as its own. Governments across the world simply reconciled themselves to the Chinese aggression against Tibet, as a result of which China has become emboldened, taking world opinion for granted.
 
Recent aggressive Chinese postures with regard to the South China Sea have upset neighbouring countries like The Philippines.  Similarly, China has caused deep anxiety to Japan and other countries by its aggressive stance regarding the Senkaku islands. 
 
China’s hostility towards India is well known. This is clearly reflected in China’s desire to cut India to size, since India is one country that can challenge China on several fronts. China claims Arunachal Pradesh province as its own, just as it proclaimed Tibet as its own earlier.
 
China is so aggressive in its plans to dominate Asian countries and the world that it protests any sort of support or recognition to the Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama, whom China drove out of Tibet, in any part of the world. China strongly protested against the Dalai Lama visiting Arunachal Pradesh in April this year. While China is not losing any opportunity to rankle India, the latest being its decision to suspend the entry of Indian pilgrims undertaking the Kailash Mansarovar pilgrimage. It has even stated that India needs to be taught lessons. 
 
When Prime Minister Narendra Modi was received with warmth by U S President Donald Trump, China expressed concern about this, fearing the close relationship between India and the US could impact China’s future plans to dominate the world.
 
Calculated moves:
 
Apart from several aggressive militant postures against Asian countries, China is also using its economic muscle to have its way to achieve its objective of world domination.
 
The Chinese ‘Belt and Road Initiative’ is yet another attempt by China to gain increased space for itself in the global sphere and get a stranglehold over the international economic and industrial growth profile.
 
China’s close relationship with Pakistan and its massive investment in Pakistan through the Economic Corridor Projects is part of China’s plan to get itself entrenched in Pakistan territory permanently. China is now playing such an important role in industrial and economic development projects in Pakistan that it appears that there is no way that Pakistan can get rid of China  from its territory, if it so desires, at any time in the future. Pakistan is now in a vice- like grip of China, as it can never repay the huge loans that China is extending as part of the Economic Corridor Projects to Pakistan.
 
Similarity to Hitler’s Germany:
 
There appears to be a similarity in approach between Adolf Hitler in Germany before World War II and the present Chinese government. Hitler wanted to conquer all of Europe so that the world would be under his domination.
China’s acts clearly give an impression that it has the same policy and approach like that of Hitler, to dominate Asia so that it would emerge as the undisputed leader of the world. 
 
Like Hitler’s Germany, the present Chinese government has suppressed freedom and dissent in China, and even Nobel Laureate Liu Ziaobo remains in prison, apart from many other Chinese citizens daring enough to assert freedom and liberty. Its suppression of dissent in Xinjiang province is another case in point.
  
The Chinese government ensures that no one in the country questions the government’s aggressive postures with regard to Tibet, Xinjiang and other countries as part of China’s ambitious expansionist targets. This is to prevent the sane voices in support of fairness and peace being heard.
 
Need to put China on notice:
 
Asian countries would be the most affected by China’s aggressive plans and priorities and they need to assert themselves before it becomes too late.  
The writing on the wall is clear. Asian countries should not hesitate to put China on notice, so that the Chinese government would realize that it cannot have its own way on all matters, without massive resistance.
 
(The author is associated with Nandini Voice for the Deprived. He can be contacted at nsvenkatchennai@gmail.com) 
 
 
 
 
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