FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Attacks on African students exposes our denial and double standards on racism
Posted:Mar 30, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
That Indians don’t know what racism and hate crime means is far from the case. Most recently, since the gunning down of an innocent Indian engineer, 32-year old Srinivas Kuchibhotla, in an Austin bar in a hate crime, Indians at home have been jolted anew to the dangers of ignorant racism in the United States. The confusion of turbaned Sikh Americans with radical Islamic terrorists, which still leads to vicious hate crimes against a wholly different, peaceful community, is also well documented. Further, between 2009 and 2013, a number of hate attacks took place on Indian students enrolled in Australian universities. Just last weekend an Indian-origin cab driver was attacked in Hobart, Australia by a group of teenagers who yelled racial slurs at him. The list of Indians or Indian-origin persons victimised by racism in the West is long. However, we would be hard pressed to call all that racist, unless we also fully acknowledge that similar insults are more frequently hurled at and attacks executed on innocent foreigners who legally arrive at our own soil. We are not just victims, we are perpetrators too and the recent incidents of violence against African students in Greater Noida, coupled with the mind-boggling charges of cannibalism and drug peddling, puts that in sharp focus.
 
The gunman who shot at Srinivas Kuchibhotla and Alok Madasani thought that they were Arabs — a case of mistaken identity with much emphasis laid on it by the local media narratives. The hater-murderer ignorantly inferred that all brown skinned men were “Arabs” and in his mind all Arabs were bad Arabs. But such ‘mistaken identity’ cases in case of black skin are more than common in India. In January 2016, a Tanzanian woman in Bengaluru was manhandled, her T-shirt torn off and her car set ablaze by a mob angry about a Sudanese man who had run over a woman earlier that day with his car. The traumatised Tanzanian victim of the mob didn’t even have an idea about the Sudanese man. The only similarly was that they happened to be both black. In 2014, Somnath Bharti, Delhi’s erstwhile law minister led an indiscriminate police raid against “prostitution” on the residents of Khirki Extension in South Delhi, home to a sizeable number of Delhi’s Africans — citizens of Nigeria, Uganda, Cameroon and Democratic Republic of Congo. The African women were humiliated and made to urinate publicly for drug tests while Bharti was found on video, urging the police to arrest them.
 
Read more at: http://indianexpress.com/article/opinion/web-edits/attack-on-african-students-exposes-our-denial-and-double-standards-on-racism-4592588/
 
 Indian Express, March 30, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Housing and Urban Affairs, Hardeep Singh Puri, is a former top diplomat who retired as India's Permanent Representative at the United Nations. In his new political avatar, as an important minister in the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Puri told INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS that
 
read-more
Aimed at consolidating cooperation between the armed forces of India and Saudi Arabia and explore new avenues of defence cooperation, Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee and Naval Chief Admiral Sunil Lanba, visited Saudi Arabia on from 4-8 February 2018, writes Anil Bhut
 
read-more
Campus placement season is here and the news is that graduates from the top campuses in India, especially the IITs, have received six figure pay packets and job offers in the US. However, looking beyond the top 200 engineering schools in India, pay packets are not looking too promising. The reason is the emergence of new engineering sc
 
read-more
Since the NDA government converted the ‘Look East’ Policy to the ‘Act East’ policy, there has been a greater sense of strategic engagement with the ASEAN, writes Gurjit Singh
 
read-more
The UN will be making contacts with Maldives leaders in response to the request by the opposition leaders for Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to oversee the all-party talks proposed by that nation's President Abdulla Yameen, Guterres's Spokesperson Stephane Dujarric said Friday.
 
read-more
Srinivasan leaves his office in Bengaluru where the lights and air-conditioners are switched off when sensors planted inside notice that he is leaving. He is prompted on his e-watch as to how much time it would take for the elevator to arrive on his floor, based on movement-recognition, writes Rajendra Shende
 
read-more

The Indian government is undertaking a project to enhance and install infrastructures related to trade and customs along its northeastern frontier, that include trading points with Bhutan.

 
read-more

Society for Policy Studies in association with India Habitat Centre held a lecture in the “2022: The India We Seek”

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: Do We Not Bleed?: Reflections of a 21-st Century Pakistani; Author: Mehr Tarar; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 240; Price: Rs 599

 
Column-image

From antiquity, the Muslim faith has been plagued by the portrayal of Muslim men regularly misusing this perceived “right” to divorce their wives instantly by simply uttering “talaq” thrice.

 
Column-image

'Another South Asia!' edited by Dev Nath Pathak makes a critical engagement with the questions about South Asia: What is South Asia? How can one pin down the idea of regionalism in South Asia wherein inter-state relations are often char...

 
Column-image

Book: A Time of Madness; Author: Salman Rashid; Publisher: Aleph; Price: Rs 299; Pages: 127

 
Column-image

Book: Why I Am A Hindu; Author: Shashi Tharoor; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 302; Price: Rs 699