Defence

China-India rivalry in new phase, says expert

India and China are following a ‘hegemonic approach’ towards their immediate neighbourhood, according to T.V. Paul, James McGill Professor of International Relations, McGill University, Canada. He was delivering a special lecture at the School of International Relations and Politics (SIRP), Mahatma Gandhi University, on Wednesday.

Jan 3, 2018
‘Both adopting a hegemonic approach to neighbourhood’
 
India and China are following a ‘hegemonic approach’ towards their immediate neighbourhood, according to T.V. Paul, James McGill Professor of International Relations, McGill University, Canada. He was delivering a special lecture at the School of International Relations and Politics (SIRP), Mahatma Gandhi University, on Wednesday.
 
Spheres of influence
 
Prof. Paul said that while China considers the Pacific, including the South China Sea, as its “backyard region and sphere of influence,” India sees South Asia and the larger Indian Ocean region as its “exclusive preserve.”
 
As the power capabilities of the two States have increased, the conceptions of order are also changing with China entering the Indian Ocean region and India foraying into the Pacific, developing strategic relations with the US and regional States and making their naval presence felt. India’s evolving maritime strategy also shows the increasing attention paid to China, he said.
 
He said these efforts showed the rivalry between India and China assuming a new and larger dimension. “The rivalry has entered a new phase with China’s ambitions to become a global power increasing since the arrival of Xi Jinping and India’s desire under Narendra Modi, to be a recognised as a rising power, began to collide in different spheres.”
 
‘Sensitive’ Tawang
 
Referring to the Arunachal Pradesh sector in the India-China border dispute, Prof. Paul said China always considered Tawang very sensitive because of its historic and religious significance for the Tibetan Buddhists.
 
The Hindu, January 4, 2018

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