FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Dear Khattar, Haryana’s pride is not in putting women behind veils
Updated:Jun 29, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
The Manohar Lal Khattar government in Haryana desperately needs to get its communication right. The March issue of Krishi Samvad, a government magazine, carries a photograph of a veiled woman carrying cattle feed. The caption on the cover reads: “Ghoonghat ki aan-baan, mahra Haryana ki pechchan” (Pride of the veil is the identity of my Haryana). Reacting sharply to the description, former chief minister Bhupinder Singh Hooda and Congress leader and party spokesperson Randeep Surjewala said it reflected the regressive attitude of the ruling BJP government. The BJP ministers, however, defended the state government, citing that the Khattar administration has taken numerous measures taken to empower women, and so it is not fair to call it “regressive”.
 
The truth is — the Khattar government may not agree — the photo and the caption shows State support for a patriarchal practice that has no place in a modern society. The Khattar government must realise that such depictions go against the pro-women programmes that it has launched and that the depiction could be seen as an extension of several misogynistic orders made earlier either by the government or local groups such as a ban on wearing jeans and using mobile phones.
 
For decades women from Haryana have broken stiff patriarchal barriers to win laurels, especially in sporting events. The State could have used any of those achievements to showcase its identity. That the women of the state don’t agree with the government’s depiction is evident from 28-year-old freestyle wrestler Geeta Phogat’s response. “We have come from a place where girls should be kept behind a veil, would not be allowed to come out... go to school (sic),” Ms Phogat, whose story inspired Dangal, told NDTV. “My father pulled us out from such a state... helped us reach where we are,” the free-style wrestler who won India’s first ever gold medal in wrestling at the Commonwealth Games in 2010 added. Does she sound all too supportive of what Haryana calls its proud identity? 
 
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Relations between India and Peru  are united by El Niño and the monsoon yet separated by vast distances across oceans.  Jorge Castaneda, Ambassador of Peru to India, talks to INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS exclusively about what is bringing the two geographically-apart countries closer.
 
read-more
Indian judge Dalveer Bhandari was re-elected to the International Court of Justice on Monday as the UN General Assembly rallied behind him in a show of force that made Britain  bow to the majority and withdraw its candidate.
 
read-more
Those with a resolve make a big difference to the society. They inspire others to make the best out of a bad situation, steer out of morass with fortitude. Insha Mushtaq, the teenage girl who was pelleted to complete blindness during 2016 emerged as a classic example of courage.
 
read-more
Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Sunday said India and China have "great potential" and they could work together at a "practical level".
 
read-more
This week a major United Nations gathering on climate change gets underway in Bonn, Germany.
 
read-more

Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to build India's global appeal for investors seem to have finally yielded returns in terms of the country's performance in the World Bank&rsquo...

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699

 
Column-image

Could the North Korean nuclear issue which is giving the world an anxious time due to presence of hotheads on each side, the invasion of Iraq and its toxic fallout, and above all, the arms race in the teeming but impoverished South Asian subcon...

 
Column-image

Title: A Bonsai Tree; Author: Narendra Luther; Publisher: Niyogi Books; Pages: 227 Many books have been written on India's partition but here is a firsthand account of the horror by a migrant from what is now Pakistan, who ...

 
Column-image

As talk of war and violence -- all that Mahatma Gandhi stood against -- gains prominence across the world, a Gandhian scholar has urged that the teachings of the apostle of non-violence be taken to the classroom.

 
Column-image

Interview with Hudson Institute’s Aparna Pande, whose book From Chanakya to Modi: Evolution of India’s Foreign Policy, was released on June 17.