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End violence by violence
Posted:Jul 25, 2017
 
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What we need to put a complete end to the ongoing war in Afghanistan—does military measure will put end, or we still need to constant on reconciliation process. Sixteen years have passed from the longest war in the history of America however, it seems to take many more years. During this period, no major breakthrough took place, rather security situation further deteriorated. This war had been feeding at the blood of Afghan civilians and military personnel—something that has to be ended logically. At the outset it was necessary for international community and to the US administration to enter Afghanistan to destroy militants following 9/11, and it was widely believed that once it was defeated foreign forces should have departed, leaving behind some residual forces to clean up the mess. 
 
Instead, the US and the international community would put weight behind nascent democracy in the war-hit country, and leave no spare in supporting this process. Still we are having support—no blind eye on that. There is no denying to the fact that US and world community helping us in several fronts, but these efforts still to bring peace and stability. We truly appreciate and feel indebted from their supports from reconstruction to constructions—from making roads to hospitals, schools, clinics—from humanitarian assistance to donations and so on… But what make us sad is that despite the prolog engagement of foreign forces into Afghan conflict, there is no peace and stability yet. This is really hurting us, and also projecting the failure of US mission in Afghanistan. The killing of innocent people is the matter of day. Civilians are bearing the brunt of casualties at highest level. To save Afghanistan from 20 terrorist groups, we have to rethink war strategy. 
 
The Afghan masses want peace, through any ways and channels. It doesn’t matter from which way or even country, what’s important is to have durable peace. There are two ways: One is to kneel down militants by military conducts, second to convince them (militant) to nod for peace talks with the Afghan government. But since the government has been putting utmost efforts to turn peace talk as a success one—however, Taliban by rejecting has frustrated not only the Afghans masses but also the government to such an extent that now the High Peace Council (HPC), responsible source to hold peace talks, has no value at the eyes of masses. 
 
Taliban are not renouncing violence, rather escalated their attacks, and HPC has failed to convince them. Viewing this, only military means could overcome current insecurity in the country. Terrorism is a common threat to the regional and globe’s safety. We were witnessed terrorist attacks in regional countries, even in some Europeans. A joint at the same time a comprehensive military operation have to be launched to eliminate Taliban and other militant outfits from the surface of this planet. Afghan and foreign forces have to response violence by violence, as it seems rational way to end militancy violence. Moreover, they (Afghan and foreign forces) must launch a large-scale military operation to chase militants from air and ground to eliminate them one and all.
 
Afghanistan Times, July 26, 2017
 
 
 
 
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