FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
First step
Updated:May 10, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
If justice was noticeably swift for India in the 2012 Delhi gang rape case, its delivery in the case of Bilkis Bano's gang rape in 2002 Gujarat was notable from another point of view. Timewise, it took 15 years; that it was delivered at last has to be credited to the extraordinary strength and trust of Ms Bano herself, together with that of her family and friends, most of whom have been repeatedly threatened. 
 
But the fact that the Bombay High Court upheld the life imprisonment of 11 of the accused was not the only thing that vindicated her trust; the court has also convicted five policemen and two doctors, let off by the lower court, for their roles in covering up for the criminals. This is possibly the first time in the history of India's sectarian violence that policemen have been convicted. The judiciary's recognition of police complicity, apart from reassuring Ms Bano herself, also points to official acknowledgment of State support for the Gujarat killings. 
 
Against the backdrop of better treatment accorded to the policemen accused in the Sohrabuddin Sheikh and Tulsiram Prajapati encounter cases, or the many other cases including that of the murder of the former parliamentarian from the Congress, Ehsan Jafri, in the Gulbarg Society massacre, in which not just the police but the most powerful politicians were let off the hook, this judgment is truly remarkable.
The judgment's importance must also be seen in the context of the present, when murders and violence occur regularly with covert State patronage. Even Ms Bano's dignified assertion of trust in the justice system is a lesson for the times: she did not want revenge, only justice. But this context also includes the Supreme Court judgment on the 2012 Delhi gang rape case. It offers a larger perspective that cannot be ignored.
 
 Being one of the "rarest of rare" cases, the four criminals in the 2012 case have been condemned to death. Ms Bano's gang rape when she was a pregnant 19-year-old, the murder of her little girl and 14 members of her family with other infants may not be rare among the kind of hate crimes that ravaged Gujarat in 2002. But the two sentences, juxtaposed, have revived the debate over the problems of capital punishment and India's acceptance of it.
 
Telegraph, May 10, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Housing and Urban Affairs, Hardeep Singh Puri, is a former top diplomat who retired as India's Permanent Representative at the United Nations. In his new political avatar, as an important minister in the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Puri told INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS that
 
read-more
Aimed at consolidating cooperation between the armed forces of India and Saudi Arabia and explore new avenues of defence cooperation, Chairman, Chiefs of Staff Committee and Naval Chief Admiral Sunil Lanba, visited Saudi Arabia on from 4-8 February 2018, writes Anil Bhut
 
read-more
Campus placement season is here and the news is that graduates from the top campuses in India, especially the IITs, have received six figure pay packets and job offers in the US. However, looking beyond the top 200 engineering schools in India, pay packets are not looking too promising. The reason is the emergence of new engineering sc
 
read-more
Since the NDA government converted the ‘Look East’ Policy to the ‘Act East’ policy, there has been a greater sense of strategic engagement with the ASEAN, writes Gurjit Singh
 
read-more
The UN will be making contacts with Maldives leaders in response to the request by the opposition leaders for Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to oversee the all-party talks proposed by that nation's President Abdulla Yameen, Guterres's Spokesperson Stephane Dujarric said Friday.
 
read-more
Srinivasan leaves his office in Bengaluru where the lights and air-conditioners are switched off when sensors planted inside notice that he is leaving. He is prompted on his e-watch as to how much time it would take for the elevator to arrive on his floor, based on movement-recognition, writes Rajendra Shende
 
read-more

The Indian government is undertaking a project to enhance and install infrastructures related to trade and customs along its northeastern frontier, that include trading points with Bhutan.

 
read-more

Society for Policy Studies in association with India Habitat Centre held a lecture in the “2022: The India We Seek”

 
read-more
Column-image

Title: Do We Not Bleed?: Reflections of a 21-st Century Pakistani; Author: Mehr Tarar; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 240; Price: Rs 599

 
Column-image

From antiquity, the Muslim faith has been plagued by the portrayal of Muslim men regularly misusing this perceived “right” to divorce their wives instantly by simply uttering “talaq” thrice.

 
Column-image

'Another South Asia!' edited by Dev Nath Pathak makes a critical engagement with the questions about South Asia: What is South Asia? How can one pin down the idea of regionalism in South Asia wherein inter-state relations are often char...

 
Column-image

Book: A Time of Madness; Author: Salman Rashid; Publisher: Aleph; Price: Rs 299; Pages: 127

 
Column-image

Book: Why I Am A Hindu; Author: Shashi Tharoor; Publisher: Aleph Book Company; Pages: 302; Price: Rs 699