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First they came for Faafu
Posted:Feb 26, 2017
 
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Of Kings and Pawns
Just over a 100 kilometres south-west of Malé, rising up from the deep blue lagoon, are 26 islands forming the atoll formally known as Faafu. This beautiful reef structure, one of twenty such natural island chains in the Maldives archipelago, is roughly 30 kilometres long and 25 kilometres wide. Five of the atoll’s islands are inhabited. Of the rest, four are under the jurisdiction of the Tourism Ministry, five leased on varuvaa[1], and five under the atoll council.
A sum total of just over four thousand people live on the islands of Feeali, Bileiydhoo, Magoodhoo, Dharan’boodhoo, and Nilandhoo the capital. Nilandhoo is large by Maldivian standards, measuring 56 hectares or half a square kilometre.
Faafu is historically significant. On Nilandhoo is the Maldives’ second oldest mosque, Aasaari Miskiyy, built over 800 years ago. As Norwegian explorer Thor Heyerdahl recounts in his book, The Maldive Mystery, he discovered the ruins of no less than seven Hindu temples and a Buddhist stupa on the island.
Life in Faafu goes a long way back; much further back than written Maldivian history is officially allowed to go.
Today Faafu is about to change beyond recognition.
 
Making Faafu Great
On 24 January President Yameen announced the atoll would soon see development ‘never before seen’ in the Maldives.
The president was speaking at a ceremony to inaugurate a ‘beautiful, modern’ mosque—gifted to the people of Magoodhoo by King Salman of Saudi Arabia. The new mosque, Masjid Al Taqwa, is not merely a place of worship, but a manifestation of the ‘special love and respect’ the desert monarch holds in his ‘noble heart’ for the islanders of Maldives. Maldivians would soon have the opportunity to welcome The King in person, said the President, God willing.
 
Read more at: http://maldivesindependent.com/feature-comment/first-they-came-for-faafu-129012
 

Maldives Independent, February 26, 2017 

 
 
 
 
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