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Gandhi was like a God to Einstein
Posted:Oct 11, 2017
 
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By Anil K. Rajvanshi
 
Two of the greatest minds of the 20th century arguably were Mahatma (Mohandas Karamchand) Gandhi and Albert Einstein. Both were born and died within 10 years of each other.
 
Although one was a statesman and the other a scientist, they had quite a number of things in common. Both were seekers of truth; Einstein, of the laws that govern the functions of universe and Gandhi, of the laws that govern existence, the human condition and its connection to universal consciousness.
 
Both men provided a new and major thought/idea to further civilization. Einstein - the theory of gravitation and Gandhi - the theory of non-violence. In the latter’s case it was more the perfection of an idea from The Buddha, put into practice. Both men were active pacifists who sought peace and harmony to exist between humans and nations.  Also both were highly-sexed human beings.
 
In April 2017, a 10-part documentary series "Genius," on the life of Einstein, was released by and aired on National Geographic. The series was intended to coincide with the centenary celebrations of the general theory of relativity which Einstein published in 1917. 
 
"Genius" has been highly acclaimed and has been watched by millions of viewers all over the world. On a visit to the US last month, I had the opportunity to watch all the episodes.
 
"Genius" is a human interest story about Einstein, with a major focus on his broken family life (he hardly had anything at all to do with his children) and his innumerable extra-marital affairs. At one level, Gandhi's family life was also miserable. Although relations with his wife were amicable, there was considerable discord between him and his four sons and among them.
 
I believe that all great acts of creativity throughout the history of mankind have been achieved by highly sexed individuals. Pablo Picasso, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, Charlie Chaplin, Isaac Newton, Einstein and Gandhi are just some of the examples of such persons.
 
Various scientific studies have shown that pheromones and other sexual activity-related chemicals are very important for the functioning of the brain. That could probably be the reason why the ancients stressed celibacy and it is practised in all societies and religions.
 
In the Indian philosophical system, brahmacharya or celibacy has a very important place and yogis and sanyasis (spiritual people) have always laid great stress on its practice. Gandhi propagated celibacy, publicly flaunted it and wrote extensively about his various experiments with brahmacharya.
 
Sexual urges are the most powerful urges of human body. They are next to hunger and thirst. Subjugating them is very difficult. The history of mankind is replete with stories of how apsaras (celestial dancers) and other heavenly beauties tried to break the brahmacharya resolve of yogis and sanyasis.
 
Gandhi's experiments in subjugating this urge and trying to sublimate it for a higher cause were truly remarkable. How much success he achieved is debatable since he had quite a number of wet dreams even at the age of 70! And he was constantly troubled by thoughts of sex. The last years of his life during which he slept naked with his teenaged nieces is a pointer to that troubled state of his mind.
 
Yet, he was brutally honest about his experiments and wrote about them.
 
Gandhi was like a God to Einstein. He openly and widely expressed his admiration for Gandhi, not only for his pacifism but, I think, also because of his ability to sublimate his sexual desires -- something that Einstein could not do. 
On Gandhi's 70th birthday, Einstein famously wrote:  “Generations to come will scarce believe that such a man as this ever in flesh and blood walked upon this earth.”
 
(The author is the Director, Nimbkar Agricultural Research Institute, Phaltan, Maharashtra)
 
 
 
 
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