FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Gandhi was like a God to Einstein
Posted:Oct 11, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
By Anil K. Rajvanshi
 
Two of the greatest minds of the 20th century arguably were Mahatma (Mohandas Karamchand) Gandhi and Albert Einstein. Both were born and died within 10 years of each other.
 
Although one was a statesman and the other a scientist, they had quite a number of things in common. Both were seekers of truth; Einstein, of the laws that govern the functions of universe and Gandhi, of the laws that govern existence, the human condition and its connection to universal consciousness.
 
Both men provided a new and major thought/idea to further civilization. Einstein - the theory of gravitation and Gandhi - the theory of non-violence. In the latter’s case it was more the perfection of an idea from The Buddha, put into practice. Both men were active pacifists who sought peace and harmony to exist between humans and nations.  Also both were highly-sexed human beings.
 
In April 2017, a 10-part documentary series "Genius," on the life of Einstein, was released by and aired on National Geographic. The series was intended to coincide with the centenary celebrations of the general theory of relativity which Einstein published in 1917. 
 
"Genius" has been highly acclaimed and has been watched by millions of viewers all over the world. On a visit to the US last month, I had the opportunity to watch all the episodes.
 
"Genius" is a human interest story about Einstein, with a major focus on his broken family life (he hardly had anything at all to do with his children) and his innumerable extra-marital affairs. At one level, Gandhi's family life was also miserable. Although relations with his wife were amicable, there was considerable discord between him and his four sons and among them.
 
I believe that all great acts of creativity throughout the history of mankind have been achieved by highly sexed individuals. Pablo Picasso, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, Charlie Chaplin, Isaac Newton, Einstein and Gandhi are just some of the examples of such persons.
 
Various scientific studies have shown that pheromones and other sexual activity-related chemicals are very important for the functioning of the brain. That could probably be the reason why the ancients stressed celibacy and it is practised in all societies and religions.
 
In the Indian philosophical system, brahmacharya or celibacy has a very important place and yogis and sanyasis (spiritual people) have always laid great stress on its practice. Gandhi propagated celibacy, publicly flaunted it and wrote extensively about his various experiments with brahmacharya.
 
Sexual urges are the most powerful urges of human body. They are next to hunger and thirst. Subjugating them is very difficult. The history of mankind is replete with stories of how apsaras (celestial dancers) and other heavenly beauties tried to break the brahmacharya resolve of yogis and sanyasis.
 
Gandhi's experiments in subjugating this urge and trying to sublimate it for a higher cause were truly remarkable. How much success he achieved is debatable since he had quite a number of wet dreams even at the age of 70! And he was constantly troubled by thoughts of sex. The last years of his life during which he slept naked with his teenaged nieces is a pointer to that troubled state of his mind.
 
Yet, he was brutally honest about his experiments and wrote about them.
 
Gandhi was like a God to Einstein. He openly and widely expressed his admiration for Gandhi, not only for his pacifism but, I think, also because of his ability to sublimate his sexual desires -- something that Einstein could not do. 
On Gandhi's 70th birthday, Einstein famously wrote:  “Generations to come will scarce believe that such a man as this ever in flesh and blood walked upon this earth.”
 
(The author is the Director, Nimbkar Agricultural Research Institute, Phaltan, Maharashtra)
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Indonesia’s President Joko Widodo has confirmed his presence for the occasion. In an exclusive interview with INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS, Indonesia’s Ambassador to India, Sidharto R.Suryodipuro, reminded Nilova Roy Chaudhury that the first Chief Guest for India’s Republic Day celebrations, in 1950, w
 
read-more
The words of Ho Chi Minh  “Nothing is more precious than independence and liberty” rang true for the people of the erstwhile East Pakistan when, with increasing brutality, the West Pakistani oppression spread across the land, writes Anwar A Khan from Dhaka
 
read-more
In a significant boost to New Delhi's Act East Policy, India and Japan set up the Act East Forum on Tuesday as agreed during Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to India this year for the annual bilateral meeting that would help to focus and catalyse development in India's Northeast.
 
read-more
  United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson reiterated on Friday Washington's warning that “all options are on the table” to meet North Korea's nuclear threat while offering to keep the lines of communication with Pyongyang open.
 
read-more
What is commonly referred to as the “border dispute” between India and China manifests itself in two distinct and separate areas of contention. One is Aksai Chin, a virtually uninhabited high-altitude desert expanse of about 37,000 square kilometres. The other is what is now the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh,
 
read-more
The first thing that one sees when a flight approaches New Delhi is thick smog that envelopes the city and its lack of greenery.  In almost all other major cities of India lack of greenery is the most obvious sight that one sees when approaching it by air.
 
read-more

Pakistan has agreed to allow the rupee to depreciate after holding talks with the International Mone­tary Fund (IMF) on the country's economy.

 
read-more

Two major global changes in the past year; the ‘Brexit’ referendum and the advent of Donald Trump, writes Sandeep Kaur Bhatia

 
read-more

It is also imperative for India to explore other regions for markets. Its trade deficit with Latin America has been narrowing. Also, its trade with Mexico, Colombia and Guatemala has increased, ...

 
read-more
Column-image

Over the last 25 years, India's explosive economic growth has vaulted it into the ranks of the world's emerging major powers. Long plagued by endemic poverty, until the 1990s the Indian economy was also hamstrung by a burdensome regulat...

 
Column-image

Title: A Ticket to Syria; Author: Shirish Thorat; Publisher: Bloomsbury India: Pages: 254; Price: Rs 399

 
Column-image

Gorichen, a majestic peak in the Eastern Himalayas at an altitude of 22,500 feet, is the highest in Arunachal Pradesh. Beautiful to look at and providing a fantastic view from the top, it is extremely tough climb for mountaineers.

 
Column-image

It is often conjectured if the reason for long-standing conflicts and insurgencies, in the developing world, especially South Asia, is not only other powers fishing in troubled waters but also the keenness of arms industries, mostly Western, to...

 
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699