Society and Culture

In Delhi homes, a false sense of privacy abets domestic violence

The threshold for intervention in domestic abuse is usually very high. Family, friends and neighbours — those closest to the victim — should be the first to pick up signs of abuse and intervene.   

Feb 20, 2017
The threshold for intervention in domestic abuse is usually very high. Family, friends and neighbours — those closest to the victim — should be the first to pick up signs of abuse and intervene.                        ?
 
 
 
A plumber beats up his wife for 12 hours before beheading her with a saw. A gory crime of this nature is not reported every day, but it could have happened anywhere in India.
 
In a village, where communities are close knit, such an ordeal would require a degree of passive complicity. In a metro such as Delhi, the prolonged torture culminated into beheading because nobody bothered to intervene.
 
The scene of the crime, Madhu Vihar, is an informal settlement in east Delhi where houses are so tightly packed it is difficult to maintain privacy. So, on February 10, when Subodh Kumar beat up his wife all night long, her repeated calls for help reached many.
 
Describing the fights as an everyday affair, a neighbour told HT that he knocked on their door and asked them to “keep it low”. Kumar told him not to interfere in his “private matter”. The neighbour called up his landlord and that was that.
 
Confident that nobody was watching, Kumar diabolically planned to cut his wife’s body into pieces over the next two days. His crime came to light only when he confessed to a friend.
 
Read more at: http://www.hindustantimes.com/columns/in-delhi-homes-a-false-sense-of-privacy-abets-domestic-violence/story-QimoqmfzLH7xLNwrVuN3mJ.html

 
Hindustan Times, February 20, 2017

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