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India-China strategic dialogue next week
Posted:Feb 17, 2017
 
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The first India-China strategic dialogue is to be held on February 22, 2017. This dialogue was proposed during the visit of Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi in August last year and it was propagated as a new mechanism for a more comprehensive dialogue between the two countries. The meet will be co-chaired by Indian Foreign Secretary S Jaishankar and Executive Vice Foreign minister Zhang Yesui.
 
The dialogue has already come into the limelight, especially after the recent incidents of friction between India and China at the global, bilateral and regional platform. China recently vetoed a US-led proposal at the UN to declare Masood Azhar a global terrorist; India has responded very strongly against this act and has questioned China’s move. The second point of friction arose when China voiced its displeasure, quite ferociously, against a recent visit to India by a Taiwanese delegation. In fact, the Chinese state media (Global Times) went so far as to say that “by challenging China over the Taiwan question, India is playing with fire.” The third issue is India’s membership to the Nuclear Suppliers Group, which China has been blocking for quite some time.
 
Setting the tone of the meet, Chinese media Global Times reported that “As competition grows the function of economic ties as a buffer to alleviate trade friction between the countries is weakened, which requires the two neighbours to deal with a complicated political situation more carefully.” In other words, China strongly declares that economic relations can no longer serve as the bedrock of this relationship. From the Indian side, the Ministry of External Affairs spokesman, Vikas Swarup, said that all points of ‘friction’ will be discussed and ways to accommodate each other’s concerns and interests will be a priority.
 
 
 
 
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