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India should get rid of obsolete mentality
Posted:Sep 8, 2017
 
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Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi met with his Pakistani counterpart Khawaja Asif in Beijing on Friday, and they spoke highly of the bilateral relations at the press conference that followed. Wang said Pakistan has been a good brother and ironclad friend of China, and that Pakistan has spared no effort in fighting terrorism.
 
The just concluded BRICS Xiamen Summit in its Xiamen Declaration for the first time named a batch of terrorist organizations, including two organizations that are based in Pakistan. Indian media therefore proclaimed it as "victory of Indian diplomacy."
 
Such conclusion is ridiculous, which is a result of India's lack of research and a show of self-compliment. Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Mohammad have been listed by the UN and Pakistan as terrorist groups subject to strikes. China agreed on including these organizations in the Xiamen Declaration, which is in line with Pakistan's official stance.
 
During the Doklam standoff between China and India, an Indian scholar blatantly claimed that China "had conflicts with 18 countries" around the South China Sea during a discussion on TV, and made himself a laughing butt. Some Indian scholars and media professionals don't do enough research before bragging around.
 
China highly cherishes the all-weather strategic cooperation partnership with Pakistan, which is unlikely to change despite pressure from India. The strategic mutual trust between China and Pakistan is unshakable. Even though they may have disagreements, they can always reach an agreement by communicating.
 
On such matters as counter-terrorism, no other country understands Pakistan's needs better than China. China and Pakistan have always kept smooth communication and cooperation on counter-terrorism, and have achieved significant progress. Counter-terrorism efforts in western China have also been improving, to which Pakistan has offered much support.
 
China-Indian relations have also been improving in the past years. But some members of the Indian elite oppose China's relations with Pakistan. They hope the improvement of China-Indian ties will push China away from Pakistan. Such an obsolete mentality has to change, otherwise it will misguide India's world view and lead to misbehavior.
 
India should be broad-minded enough to accept China-Pakistan friendship, and it should view China as a country to help it improve its relations with Pakistan, rather than viewing China as its tool to contain Pakistan. India should understand that Pakistan, as a nuclear-armed country, can't be taken down. How India views China-Pakistan friendship depends on whether it wants to strategically reconcile with Pakistan.
 
Global Times, September 9, 2017
 
 
 
 
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