FB   
 
Powered bysps
        Society for Policy Studies
 
 

 
Loopholes galore
Posted:Jun 20, 2017
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 
The Commission for the Investigation of Abuse of Authority (CIAA) nabs some people from time to time and files legal cases of corruption against them in the Special Court.
 
Some of the accused are convicted; others are cleared of the charges. Right now, the anti-graft agency has just filed cases against eight officials of Transport Management Office, Itahari, including three under-secretaries, on charges of revenue embezzlement. They faced action after a CIAA probe committee found that they had embezzled more than Rs.612 million in the past three years.
 
The accused had deposited just Rs.618 million as revenue collected in 2014-15, whereas the actual collection stood at Rs.657 million. The misappropriated amount rose sharply in the following year (2015-16) to Rs.256 million. The transport office collects vehicle tax and road maintenance tax and has to deposit all the revenue in the government’s bank accounts.
 
One also wonders at the actual scale and spread of corruption which can take innumerable forms when government servants do not hesitate to pocket even collected government revenue which is already in the record books.
 
Corruption is committed in purchases, in delivery of numerous kinds of services to the public, in awarding contracts and in certifying completion of contracted work, in giving privilege, incentives or tax waivers to businessmen and others, in under-invoicing and over-invoicing, in favouring people in appointments, lucrative postings, as well as promotion, in reducing tax or other liability, in clearing goods through the customs checkpoints, and in innumerable other areas of government jurisdiction.
 
Despite sporadic examples of CIAA action, corruption has not abated. Ever-growing corruption is shown in the annual reports of the Auditor’s General, among other things, as unsettled accounts amounting to many billions of rupees.
 
The country is still in the tight grip of the unholy alliance of business, politicians and bureaucrats. We can also find an indication of this in the fact that unless the autonomous CIAA acts, as in the recent case of tax waivers, including VAT, amounting to Rs.21 billion, government bosses hardly ever act against their erring subordinates.
 
Failure to take action against offenders or do one’s prescribed duty should also be punishable, which is not so in many cases in the country. Through that loophole, corrupt leaders and employees harass service seekers till they are driven to desperation to be ready to pay under the table.
 
The branches of the CIAA should be expanded together with the human and other resources, equipment and technology through which it can do its duty better. In the selection of most commissioners and the employees of the CIAA too, enough attention and rigour are not shown by the political leaders, leading to a perennially less effective CIAA.
 
There is no system by which the spending, bank accounts, other properties, and lifestyles of the holders of public office may be deeply investigated and action initiated against those who cannot prove their honesty. There is thus much virgin territory in corruption monitoring and prosecuting in the country which should be fully explored.
 
All the faces of corruption should be unmasked and corrupt people must be mercilessly punished, and they should be socially despised too.
 
Anti-drug drive
 
Youngsters are easily lured to take narcotic drugs due to peer group influence, and it is very difficult to be free from drug abuse once they indulge in such practice.
 
In order to raise awareness among youths about the consequences of taking narcotic drugs in society and family, the Ministry of Home Affairs has launched a week long campaign urging the students and youth to avoid the use of illicit drugs that may be detrimental to their life if no cure is taken on time.
 
It is the family members who have to bear a huge burden to take care of their children.
 
Young people can be prevented from taking illicit drugs if the government agencies, drug dealers, society and parents keep vigil on the narcotic and illicit drugs being circulated in the market through a network. Home Ministry says that over 90,000 are addicted to illicit drugs across the country and, it is on the rise.
 
It cannot be controlled unless all come together to fight the illicit trade and trafficking of life threatening drugs. Awareness campaigns must be launched in schools and colleges where a large number of youth study.
 
The Himalayan Times, June 20, 2017
 
 
 
 
Print
Share
  
increase Font size decrease Font size
 

Disclaimer: South Asia Monitor does not accept responsibility for the views or ideology expressed in any article, signed or unsigned, which appears on its site. What it does accept is responsibility for giving it a chance to appear and enter the public discourse.
Comments (Total Comments 0) Post Comments Post Comment
Review
 
 
 
 
spotlight image Indonesia’s President Joko Widodo has confirmed his presence for the occasion. In an exclusive interview with INDIA REVIEW & ANALYSIS, Indonesia’s Ambassador to India, Sidharto R.Suryodipuro, reminded Nilova Roy Chaudhury that the first Chief Guest for India’s Republic Day celebrations, in 1950, w
 
read-more
The words of Ho Chi Minh  “Nothing is more precious than independence and liberty” rang true for the people of the erstwhile East Pakistan when, with increasing brutality, the West Pakistani oppression spread across the land, writes Anwar A Khan from Dhaka
 
read-more
In a significant boost to New Delhi's Act East Policy, India and Japan set up the Act East Forum on Tuesday as agreed during Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's visit to India this year for the annual bilateral meeting that would help to focus and catalyse development in India's Northeast.
 
read-more
  United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson reiterated on Friday Washington's warning that “all options are on the table” to meet North Korea's nuclear threat while offering to keep the lines of communication with Pyongyang open.
 
read-more
The 15th trilateral meeting of the foreign ministers of Russia, India and China concluded in New Delhi on Monday with many nuanced takeaways embedded in the joint statement of 46 paragraphs. Reiterating that the forum “is not directed against any other country”, the statement underlined the importance of the establishment o
 
read-more
The first thing that one sees when a flight approaches New Delhi is thick smog that envelopes the city and its lack of greenery.  In almost all other major cities of India lack of greenery is the most obvious sight that one sees when approaching it by air.
 
read-more

Pakistan has agreed to allow the rupee to depreciate after holding talks with the International Mone­tary Fund (IMF) on the country's economy.

 
read-more

Two major global changes in the past year; the ‘Brexit’ referendum and the advent of Donald Trump, writes Sandeep Kaur Bhatia

 
read-more

It is also imperative for India to explore other regions for markets. Its trade deficit with Latin America has been narrowing. Also, its trade with Mexico, Colombia and Guatemala has increased, ...

 
read-more
Column-image

Over the last 25 years, India's explosive economic growth has vaulted it into the ranks of the world's emerging major powers. Long plagued by endemic poverty, until the 1990s the Indian economy was also hamstrung by a burdensome regulat...

 
Column-image

Title: A Ticket to Syria; Author: Shirish Thorat; Publisher: Bloomsbury India: Pages: 254; Price: Rs 399

 
Column-image

Gorichen, a majestic peak in the Eastern Himalayas at an altitude of 22,500 feet, is the highest in Arunachal Pradesh. Beautiful to look at and providing a fantastic view from the top, it is extremely tough climb for mountaineers.

 
Column-image

It is often conjectured if the reason for long-standing conflicts and insurgencies, in the developing world, especially South Asia, is not only other powers fishing in troubled waters but also the keenness of arms industries, mostly Western, to...

 
Column-image

Title: The People Next Door -The Curious History of India-Pakistan Relations; Author: T.C.A. Raghavan; Publisher: HarperCollins ; Pages: 361; Price: Rs 699